Ep 46 Why Taking a Break from Your Art is Sometimes a Good Thing

Ep 46 Why Taking a Break from Your Art is Sometimes a Good Thing

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today we are talking about why taking a break from your art is sometimes a good thing! Around this time of year that we can start to flag a little bit. I don’t know if it’s the cold (and you want to hibernate like I do), or the fact we do so much more during the summer when the days are longer. Sometimes there comes a point where we can really benefit from a little time out of our art.

We can put so much pressure on ourselves to be productive and creative. But when you never allow yourself a break, you can deny yourself an opportunity to recharge and sometimes even face a complete art block.

So how do you recognise the difference between just not being in the mood, and when actually it’s time to take a little time out to recharge?

Some of the things we discuss:

  • The difference between stopping creating art because you are feeling lazy and stopping because you are feeling burned out
  • How a big creative challenge can make you want a break or change of direction
  • How the time of year can affect our creative output or the type of art we create
  • How you can take a break from your art without going completely cold-turkey with your creativity
  • Why a break could be the perfect time to fill yourself with new creative inspiration
  • Why it might be a good idea to set a time for an art break, rather than letting the time drift.

The urban sketching tutorial site we mentioned

The site I mention that I have been watching Urban sketching Tutorials on is MyBluprint. It was a site I learned about from our previous guest, Urban Sketcher Lynne Chapman.

Sandra’s urban sketch that got rained on

This was the urban sketch that Sandra did that got rained on that we talked about on the show. It formed a lovely effect.

Sandra urban sketching street scene

If you enjoy the podcast you can support us by buying us a coffee. We want to make a coffee froth moustache.

This week’s creative question

Q. What subjects do you tend to avoid sketching and why?

Question: What subjects do you tend to avoid sketching and why?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 45 Creative Chat with Illustrator and Urban Sketcher Lynne Chapman

 Ep 45 Creative Chat with Illustrator and Urban Sketcher Lynne Chapman

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s guest is Illustrator and Urban Sketcher Lynne Chapman. Lynne has had a fascinating career and lots of tips to share if you’re an aspiring illustrator. But what made us reach out to Lynne was her amazing urban sketching. As you may know Sandra and I are both working on improving our sketching on location and whenever I’d google “urban sketching tips” Lynne’s name would pop up. So if you’re interested in illustration or urban sketching I think you’ll really enjoy this interview.

Originally Lynne wanted to be a painter, but it worked out that illustration was a better fit. She has had lots of interesting twists and turns to her career. After many years of working as an illustrator, she is now lucky enough to make her living from sketch (how cool is that!)

urban sketching materials

Lynne’s urban sketching kit

Lynne talks about

  • How she trained in Printed Textile Design, but then made the change into illustration
  • How she moved from illustrating greeting cards, to editorial work, and eventually to children’s illustration.
  • Tips for drawing things from your imagination. Lynne also has an online course for creating Children’s Characters
  • The value of keeping sketchbooks (she has over 200)
  • How she started urban sketching and how that developed over the years
  • The materials she recommends for urban sketching – Lynne also has a fantastic book about sketching people
  • How she now makes her living Urban Sketching

Lynne Chapman – Urban Sketching Mine section

Urban sketch fire engine

Urban sketch fire engine

Lynne talking about illustrating traditionally rather than digitally

I’m always getting emails from people who want to want to do children’s book illustration. And they asked me what software I use. And they were worried because they don’t know how to use the software. And you know, they think they need to learn it. And I’m always able to reassure them that actually learning illustration is a hard enough challenge on its own, you really don’t need to layer over the top of that, learning this kind of new media if you’re not all, if you’re not already okay with it. So it’s not necessary to do it digitally. And quite a lot of illustrators actually are still not even techie that we’re a funny bunch, actually.

Lynne Illustrating Jungle Grumble

Lynne Illustrating Jungle Grumble

Lynne talking about when she joined the Urban Sketchers Group

…I saw people using watercolour, and I’d never been able to paint. And I’d never learned how to use watercolour. And every time you get a book on how to use watercolour, it’s all about stretching paper and laying layers down. And it’s all very complicated and, you know, slow. And I’m incredibly impatient. And I couldn’t be doing with any of that. So I never painted with colour, and then I saw this stuff. And there are all these people just they’re not doing any of that they’re just chucking paint over paper and drawing all over it. And I thought, oh my god, you can do that. It’s allowed So I started to experiment with colours.

And from the moment I joined Urban Sketchers, I started to draw and colour, either using watercolours, or the other thing I discovered was something that I still use all the time is Derwent Inktense pens, pencils. Because on a train, you can’t really be using watercolours. It’s a bit of a kind of a faff. And, yeah, you don’t want to be tipping paint over anybody or paint water. So I use these pencils, which were, they bought coloured pencils, but they’re not like watercolour pencils you’ve ever used before. They’re sort of like watercolour pencils on acid, you know.

Lyne Chapman RHB urban sketching beach-painting

Lynne sketching on Robin Hood’s Bay Beach

 

Lynne's Textiles - crazy plastic

Lynne’s Textiles – crazy plastic

Find out more about Lynne Chapman

Lynne Chapman - Very Warm Welcome

Lynne Chapman – Very Warm Welcome

 


Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 44 Urban Sketching – How to plan a successful sketching trip

Ep 44 Urban Sketching Trip

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today we are talking about the importance of going out specifically to sketch from life, and how to plan a successful trip.

Obviously, not everyone can dedicate a whole day to sketching on a regular basis. It might be that you can only spare your lunch hours at work, but we can talk about ‘snatching time to sketch’ in a future episode. Today we are focussing on arranging a dedicated sketching day trip.

We forgot to mention on the podcast that there is a website http://www.urbansketchers.org/ and Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/urbansketchers/ dedicated to urban sketching around the world. If you live near a city, you might be lucky enough to find a group near you.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • Whether you want to sketch alone or with other people, including organising local sketching meetups.
  • Where to sketch
  • What to take with you, from art materials to something to sit on
  • What sort of bag you might want to use
  • What to wear
  • Planning what you want to achieve
  • Apps to help you plan your sketching trip – Rome to Rio, GPS my City, Find my Friends App iOS and Android 
  • Getting deals on travel – Groupon, Tesco Club Card deals on Hotels.com

And we also talk about getting those warm-up sketches out of the way. In fact, every time you do a sketch you don’t like, just call it a warm-up! Oh and Sandra thinks it’s important to mention, not to forget your tampons. She doesn’t even have a weird use for them like some of the suggestions she had in our Art Tips Podcast!

If you enjoy the podcast you can support us by buying us a coffee. We want to make a coffee froth moustache.

This week’s creative question

Q. If you could go urban sketching anywhere, where would it be and why?

If you could go urban sketching anywhere, where would it be and why?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 43 Creative Chat With Artist and illustrator Barbara Johansen Newman

ep43 podcast Artist and illustrator Barbara Johansen Newman

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is artist and illustrator Barbara Johansen Newman from www.johansennewman.com

Johansen Newman - Year of the Rooster

Johansen Newman – Year of the Rooster

Barbara has had a fascinating career from puppetry to illustration to licensing. And now she has gone back to her first love which is painting. What is interesting about Barbara’s art is that although her figurative paintings are interesting in themselves, she builds a world around them using found objects and by painting on unusual surfaces.

Johansen Newman - Pilot

Johansen Newman – Pilot

Barbara talks about

  • How she started drawing in her crib (yes she was born to be an artist)
  • How she initially went to a private art college, which turned out to be a bad match for her
  • How she got involved in creating puppets and became a puppeteer
  • How she transitioned from creating puppets to illustration and writing children’s books
  • Why she has come back to her first love which is painting and where she gets her inspiration
  • Her advice on doodling and keeping sketchbooks
  • What inspired her to use found materials in her art
  • Her tips for discovering your art style
Johansen Newman - She Who Wears the Color

Johansen Newman – She Who Wears the Color

Find out more about Barbara

Recent work and works in progress get shared on Instagram at  https://www.instagram.com/johansennewman/

Barbara’s website: www.johansennewman.com

Barbara’s Facebook Page:  www.facebook.com/JohansenNewmanART

Johansen Newman - Family Portrait

Johansen Newman – Family Portrait

Barbara also kindly answered our initial podcast questions in text form which you can read by clicking below.

To see Barbara's answers in writing click here

When did your love for drawing begin?

This will seem somewhat unbelievable, but I actually started drawing in my crib. My mother used to give me crayons and let me go to town on the wall. It was an older house so she didn’t mind at all. Some years later I happened to visit that house and, sure enough, my scribbles were still on the wall.

Did you take the traditional route and go to art college?

I started out going to a private college, having applied to and gotten into their art program. It was near NYC and I wanted access to the museums. It turned out to be a bad match. I just wanted to draw and paint and everything back then (talking early 70s here) was conceptual art, especially in that school. So I came home and took almost all art classes at a local community college for a year. That was wonderful. I drew, I painted, I did printmaking, and I made sculpture. And many of my teachers were actually professional artists, fairly well known in their fields. Some would drive up from New York (where their studios were) to teach. What I thought I would get in the private college I really got in the NY State community college, for next to nothing in tuition. After that year I made plans to transfer to another school. I got into Parsons in NYC and into the State University at Buffalo. I ended up in Buffalo.

You started your career in a puppet theatre. Can you tell us a bit about that and what made you change direction and go into illustration?

While was going to the community college I was teaching part-time at a school. There I met a fellow teacher who was a puppeteer. I ended up driving into New York with her several times a week to study at the Bil Baird Theater in the Village. When I transferred up to Buffalo I began performing with my husband in that area. We were often hired to perform at craft fairs and so I began to make puppets and dolls to sell at those fairs. Eventually, all I did was create the soft sculptures. When we moved to Boston, I just wanted to draw and paint again. Illustration was something I had intended to study at Parsons. So I spent some time creating work for a portfolio and then I pounded the pavement looking for work—literally. There was no internet back then. You had to take your “book” around to get work. I pursued both the children’s book market and the editorial market. Ultimately, my first illustration work was editorial.

How did you go about creating your characters?

When I was in that community college for a year, there was a wonderful professor who was the head of the art department. One day he gave me advice that I have followed to this day. “Barbara,” he said, “Draw from your head.” And I do. I almost always start out with blank paper and a pencil and just draw figures and faces that come out of the blue. Even when I am working on portraits of specific people, I first do pencil sketches from my imagination.

You also wrote three of your own children’s books. What made you decide to do that and how did you find the process?

I have always enjoyed writing to some extent (blogged for years), but I began focusing on children’s books because I wanted to create my own venues for illustrating. It was as simple as that. I will say this: of all my artistic endeavors, the kids’ book market was/is the most challenging and often the most artistically stifling. I‘m glad I did it (worked in the field for about 20 years) but I am very happy to have that world behind me.

You later moved on to design, licensing and finally painting, which you describe as your first love. What made you venture away from illustration and what is it about painting in particular that you love so much?

In the end, I find that I am my own best art editor. I love the freedom of creating what I want to create without worrying about specs and art direction. That is actually how the doll work was for me, as well. I made what my heart told me to make, then sold it. Licensing was a little bit of that; I did the patterns I wanted to do and then found the market to sell them to. Now that I am painting I am happier than ever. I love putting paint on a surface and I am never without an idea for a new piece. Ironically, though, I do check out the “Calls for Art” on various sites. Sometimes I will even paint something that might fit the bill for the show theme. And, of course, those applications have deadlines. So in some ways, I have put restrictions on myself again. Old habits die hard.

You work is mainly figurative. What draws you to painting people?

The figure has always fascinated me. Even as a doll maker, I loved creating the persona of a character and then presenting it. I’m enamored with the details that distinguish one person from another. I am also a storyteller at heart. Figures hint at a narrative yet to be told.

Do you use reference images as a starting point to your work or are they completely from imagination?

I always work from my imagination to start. If I need reference, I find it afterwards.

I read that you love to draw and paint listening to books, movies, or TV in the background. How do you feel that helps you?

I like to work from my heart and gut instead of from my head. Do you find that you do the best doodles while talking on the phone? I do. It’s the same concept. I try to create from a place that is instinctual, rather than something I think too much about. I do my best work that way. I’ll listen to

anything sometimes, but I now love Podcasts like yours and others. And I love great books. It just takes me away and the painting or drawing seems to emerge from some subconscious place inside of me. I’ll even listen to junky TV. For a while I listened to every ghost hunting television program known to man.

You use found materials and different surfaces in your work, please can you talk us through your process?

Right now I am starting first with my painting idea then deciding on the frame and embellishments afterwards. I prefer to paint on a hard surface, so almost always use either wood or a wood panel. If I work on a canvas tarp, I pin it against a hard surface. My husband helps me build the frame I design. For some of the earlier pieces, I created the frames first then the painting afterwards. But often, something would need to be added to the frame to complement the painting. Sometimes the frame and the painting are worked on at the same time, and one informs the other.

What inspired you to use found materials, can you remember the first piece you created that way?

An artist friend whose work we have collected and who created an installation on our kitchen first inspired me. He showed me ways to take the antique dough boards I was using and make them unique. He made me think outside the box when it came to found objects and materials. The first piece created this way was the larger painting with the sled runners on the side, which he created with me. After that, I did not want to return to unaltered canvas or surfaces.

Your style is very distinct, has your style changed and developed over time?

My painting work has become more like my early editorial illustration work in that it’s edgier and tighter. My paintings from around 2012, when I was still illustrating books, had more whimsy to them. That whimsy is leaving me. There is still an element of not taking myself too seriously (I love art that sometimes brings a smile to your face), but I would say my work is more determined now and less lighthearted.

What tips would you have for an artist that is trying to discover their style?

Get hold of several sketchbooks and plenty of pencils and draw, draw, draw. It’s like handwriting—your mark-making will be unique to you. The only way to discover a personal style and help to solidify it is to keep doing it. Even if you work abstractly, draw. Draw abstractly. But keep making marks. Your style will eventually be recognizable.

Do you have any tips for promoting and selling your work?

I could write volumes for this answer if you asked me about building an illustration career. Feel free to ask me that at some point.

Now I am painting and I feel like I am swimming in strange waters. But I am beginning to have increasing success in the 2-3 years I have only focused on painting, and I would say that it is because I paint many hours every single day and I look for opportunities to get my work seen. For me, those opportunities come by submitting to juried shows at galleries and venues around the country. I have not seriously sought out gallery representation yet, but I have begun to sell my work privately, through word of mouth. I also think that Instagram is the best thing since sliced bread. It’s a great way to share your work with the public and even get some feedback. I have not yet translated Instagram exposure into sales, but it has given me some opportunities for showing my work. And some galleries and venues for showing my work have contacted me.

How important do you think regular sketching is for an artist? Are you a sketcher yourself?

It’s everything. It’s how you take the seeds of even the smallest idea and help them develop. It’s how you realize your own style. It’s immediate and satisfying. And it helps you to gain confidence when generating new work concepts. I love sketching as much as I love painting. I recently set up a new studio space strictly for working on paper.

What are your plans for the future?

I want nothing more than to continue to make art and get it seen by a growing number of people. Increased sales might be nice, but it is not what drives me. In fact, sometimes I hate parting with my work. I sold a favorite piece recently and it was very difficult to let it go, but the collectors were the best kind of collectors, so I know it has a great home.

Where can people find out more about you and your books?

(My most recent work and works in progress get shared on Instagram) On my web site:

On my Instagram account:

https://www.instagram.com/johansennewman

On my Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/JohansenNewmanART


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 42 Knowing When a Piece of Art is Finished

Ep 42 Knowing when a Piece of Art is Finished

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

Sandra wasn’t entirely sure it was Da Vinci, but we’ve checked it now… Phew…she was right

Today we are talking about how to recognise when your piece of art is ready to be abandoned. Not knowing when to stop can be the difference between a beautiful piece of work, and something that is overworked and almost sterile.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • How timed sketches might help you decide what’s important (Sandra loves these 😉 )
  • The idea of timed intervals for your work
  • What you need to stand back and look at your work
  • Leaving your work and coming back with fresh eyes
  • The idea of one of our group members for how to make copies of your drawings to paint
  • How different media make a difference to how much you can rework your art
  • Why if you start thinking about things to add to your work, you might already have gone too far
  • The idea of using a mirror, not to look at your gorgeous face (mwah, mwah) but the reflection of your art in it

This week’s creative question

Q. What’s most important to you, the creative process or the outcome and why?

Q What's most important to you the creative process or the outcome?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 42:
Knowing When Your Piece of Art is Finished.
(Record 07/08, airs 19/08)

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Podcast Reviews

Firebolt_cal

Love these Girls!

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“This podcast is full of down to earth art banter. Tips and creative information. Great guests and I love visiting the website and being involved in the challenges.”

TARA:
Falling in Love

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“Hello… so glad I found these ladies! So fun and gobs of information!! On top of it all, they have an amazing website with challenges, how to videos and more! My top three podcasts now! A MUST for any creative! Thank you!!”

momoffourkings via Apple Podcasts · United States of America · 07/17/19

SANDRA
Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Maybe you could mention the postcard swap and how great it was to see people in the group connecting?

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Sketching trip – Brighton

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

Tell everyone about the T-shirts and notebooks on amazon?

SANDRA

As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

So today we are talking about how to recognise when your piece of art is ready to be abandoned, to avoid overworking your art.

And that is something we see a lot in the art world. I’ve been very guilty of it myself in the past, certainly in my sketchbook, although thankfully I have gone more the other way these days I think.

But not knowing when to stop can be the difference between a beautiful piece of work, and something that is overworked and almost sterile.

TARA

You and I have always been very different in our approach in that you have always loved to get lost in detail, whereas I bore easily. But I think there is a happy medium because I’ve always wished I had more patience, whereas you’ve always wanted to be looser in your approach. But I think through working together creatively for so long, we have both changed a lot in that way.

Talk about how you have changed
Talk about how you’ve noticed a difference in my own approach to sketching

SANDRA

I’m talking specifically about sketching because I’ve no wish to change my style of painting, but yes, I think partly it’s us doing a lot together including trips out dedicated to sketching and also the fact that I do it so much more than I used to and I think that’s where confidence comes in to it.

Once you are comfortable with making mistakes and just playing with lines until they are right, you will naturally end up with a looser and more energetic piece.

The hardest part then is knowing where to stop.

TARA

One of the reasons I like timed sketches is that they don’t give you time to fiddle around and overwork. Even if you are working on a more detailed piece, setting timed intervals to make yourself stand back and look at what stage you’re at might help.

Elaborate

SANDRA
.

Of course, as you know, I hate doing timed sketches, but when I have no pressure, I can easily create a sketch in a minute or two now because I just don’t over think it anymore. I’ve learned that it’s a big mistake to go back to a sketch and add something to it. Once you start, you’re on the way to losing it’s energetic and spontaneous feel.

TARA:

I did a black and white semi-abstract face drawing in my sketchbook recently. I really liked it, but then decided to try adding colour. But it tried adding colour and it didn’t work. it doesn’t really matter as it was just a sketch and my sketchbook is for trying things. But I think the moral is, if you like something leave it.

Elaborate

Talk about the suggestion in our group to create a copy to paint.
Talk about interesting suggestions in upcoming interview with Barbara Johansen Newman

SANDRA

Less is usually more. Some of my favourite sketches are the ones where I haven’t even added a face. For the most part, when it comes to sketching, you’re aiming to express the feel of the scenario, rather than the perfect image of what you’re looking at.

TARA

Some media is much easier to overwork that others. With acrylic you can keep adding layers, but with watercolours it’s much easier to make a muddy mess, so you need to be more careful.

SANDRA

Suggest going in much stronger than you think with watercolour and using only transparent colours

When it comes to my paintings I have learned over time that when I lay a brushstroke that doesn’t make a difference for better or for worse, that’s usually the time to stop.

If I’m in doubt, I stop, turn it against a wall and look at it a week later with fresh eyes. If nothing is immediately obvious, then I leave it right there.

TARA

If I like how something is looking that’s usually time to stop.

But it can be interesting to photograph your work in stages, then even if you do take things too far you can learn from your mistakes and see where you should have stopped.

SANDRA

If in doubt, leave it out.

Turn your painting to the wall and don’t look at it for at least a week.

Explain how this helps.

TARA:

When I am working on a design piece and I start to think about what can I add to make this work, I know I need to stop and rethink. It’s the same with art once you get to the point where you think what else can I add to this to make it work you’ve usually gone too far.

SANDRA

One common mistake artists often make is they stay too close to their art as the work without stepping right back.

Explain why stepping back and viewing from a distance is a good idea.

TARA

The good thing is, the more you do, the more confident you will become in your choices and where you choose to finish.

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

SANDRA
Julie Kitzes Waking up at 7am, wandering over to my desk, and hopping straight into about five different projects before I even eat or shower.

TARA
MJ Stead Up by 7, coffee, shower, dog park and paint in the studio from 12-12:30 – 5 or 6pm. I often go back in to paint after dinner too.

SANDRA
Ben King Up at 630 with my now 1 year old son, work by 8, draw during lunch from noon to 1pm, home by 5, baby in bed around 830-9, a little more drawing of I’m not prepping a lesson.

TARA
Nik TayTay West Wake. Stretch: timed sketches. Flex: wip. Cardio: commissions. Endurance: graphic design. Torture: Etsy listings. Play: photography. Relaxation: doodles. Sleep.

SANDRA
Mummsy Savo Wake, shower volunteer work at local Hospiscare shop, check phone, look for inspiration. After dinner cooked by Himself cover the table with all my materials and start straight into a drawing

TARA
Veena Madhu Work from 9-5:30ish, trying to fit creative activities around it 🙂 spend train rides either messing on music apps or listening to instrumentals and writing lyrics to them. Some graphic design study at night, some drawing/ painting on weekends. Ideally would like them to go hand in hand, one art form inspiring another.

SANDRA
Colin Pidgeon Up 6.30. Work 8-4.30 (paint at lunchtime sometimes), home to chores, sort oout kids etc. Paint from 9.30 – 1am or so. Go to bed with bleary eyes and a sore back…

TARA
Deb Saine art! art! and then, more art!

SANDRA
Susan Simon Sweetlineart I get the brushes I love and the watercolors, cut 90 lb hot press into a small sheet and paint a dog

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What’s most important to you? The creative process or the outcome and why?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Before we go, we just want to mention the challenges we have coming up for September

Read them out.

SANDRA:
Sketchathon September
So it’s September already and that Sketchbook that you promised yourself you would fill this year has gathered an entire inch of dust, each page remaining completely blank. Well now is the time to change that! We are challenging you to fill at least one page of your sketchbook every day throughout the month. The object here is to form a sketching habit and to finally make that sketchbook something interesting to look at!

TARA:
Quotember
Introducing our brand new, motivational challenge, Quotember.

We are challenging you to create an inspirational quote, using unusual text, such as calligraphy, or your own unique font style, every day throughout the month of September.

Imagine how many people you will inspire with your words each day, including yourself!

This is the challenge to help you train your mind, and others, to think more positively.

SANDRA:
Quick Kick September
“Quick Kicks” are our monthly creative challenges that you can complete in 15 minutes or less per day. For ‘Quick Kick September’ we are challenging you to create a blind contour drawing/painting every day of the month. To create a blind contour drawing simply decide on your subject. This could be anything you like: a still life, a friends face or something in a reference photo. Then draw your subject by studying it carefully but DO NOT look at your paper as you draw.

TARA:
Kicktime September

KickTime is our monthly challenge designed for those creatives who would prefer to sink their teeth into one big project over the whole month, rather than to take part in lots of smaller ones.

And it’s designed for any kind of creative project. We will give you a prompt each month and you can use it to inspire a story, a poem, a piece of art, a piece of music, an animation, a film, a screen play… The list is endless!

The best part is that you get to work on any creative project, which is inspired by that word, for a whole month. This months prompt is “Metal”

SANDRA

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-hearted and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 41 Creative Chat with Mixed Media Artist Deb Weiers

ep 41 Podcast with Mixed Media Artist Deb Weiers

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is Deb Weiers from www.debweiersart.com @debweiersart. Deb is a mixed media artist based in Red Deer Canada who creates amazing semi-abstract faces. Her art is incredibly distinct and she uses a very intuitive approach to create her art. It was seeing Debs Faces that inspired me to try creating a few semi-abstract faces myself for our Abstract Art April Challenge.

Always Contemplating 11x15

Always Contemplating (11″ x 15″)

In this podcast Deb talks about:

  • Her background and how she got started with art
  • How she got started painting faces, a subject that initially she didn’t like
  • Her process for creating paintings starting with abstract marks
  • How she developed her distinctive style and ideas for developing your own
  • Her favourite art materials
  • Selling her work via Instagram
Girl With Dog 10x12

Girl With Dog (10″ x 12″)

The art class that got Deb into painting faces

Let’s Face it by Kara Strachan Bullock Art

Artists Deb admires

Deb’s Book

Deb has recently released a book featuring her work, called the Many Faces of Deb

Amazon UK | Amazon US

She Was Not Sure About Her New Boyfriend 10x14

She Was Not Sure About Her New Boyfriend (10″ x 14″)

Find out more about Deb Weiers


A big thank you to Deb Saine in our Facebook Group for introducing us to Deb Weiers Work and suggesting some of the questions.

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 40 Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it

Ep 40 Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about why artists and writers often live with guilt and how to overcome it. Although everyone can feel guilty at times, the problem for creatives is that they tend to get a double dose. Artists and writers can feel guilty when they are creating and yet they can also feel guilty when they’re not. So this is where finding a balance is really important.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • Some of the things that we feel might feel guilty about as creatives
  • Suggestions for fitting in your creative pursuit in ways that you can be guilt-free – eg. getting up earlier
  • Why art and creativity can improve our mood and well being which means that we are a happier person to be around
  • Why the cost of creating art shouldn’t make you feel guilty
  • Why you still might feel guilty even if your art/writing is your career
  • Ideas to get your family involved – including drawing your partner/spouse naked (Sandra’s enlightened idea 🙂)

This week’s creative question

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

Podcast Question What does your typical creative day look like?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 39:
Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it.

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:
Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

SANDRA
In today’s episode, we talk about why artists and writers often live with guilt and how to overcome it.

Although everyone can feel guilty at times, the problem for creatives is that they tend to get a double dose. Artists and writers can feel guilty when they are creating and yet they can also feel guilty when they’re not. So this is where finding a balance is really important.

So we are going to look at why we feel guilty, the main things that make us feel guilty and ways that we can create a balance and overcome those feelings.

TARA

I think one of the things that make us feel guilty is because what we do is fun. We enjoy it.

It’s an odd thing that we should feel like that, but a lot of people around us can make us feel that what we are doing is frivolous compared to other stuff we have to do.

And because of this, you can end up putting your art or writing right at the bottom of the pile, as a lower priority than the other things we ‘should’ be doing.

But this is a mistake. Often the things that we ‘should’ be doing, really can wait. Whereas our creativity demands a certain amount of self-discipline and consistency.

SANDRA
One of the most obvious things that we need to do is household chores. If the dishes have piled up or you know the hoovering needs to be done, we know that we are going to feel really bad when everyone gets home to find it hasn’t been done, but instead, you have finished a chapter of the book you are writing or an illustration you needed to finish.

But the thing about the housework is that a few hours after you’ve done it, it needs to be done again! It’s a constant thing we have to keep on top of. But a book doesn’t write itself, and once it’s done, it’s done and you can get on to the next thing.

Obviously, I’m not saying we shouldn’t clean our homes. But we should certainly put that lower down on the list of priorities. We can do that anytime!

TARA

You could get up an hour before everyone else does, I remember someone doing early rise August last year and said it had competency changed things for them.

Elaborate on the above. Talk about when you tried it.

Sandra you once did that too.

What did you do with that extra time?

SANDRA
.

I’ve continued getting up an hour earlier than I need to and I still do it now.

Sometimes I use it to do some sketching and other times I’ll use it to do whatever chores need doing so I’ll have time for creativity later on in the day when I’d normally be doing housework.

I’ve even used that time to prepare the dinner for later on so I  can look forward to doing some creative work later instead of having to cook.

TARA:
If your art is a hobby, don’t make the mistake of thinking it’s a low priority.

Art and any kind of creativity is not only something you enjoy but often something that helps with general well-being and mood.

Think of it as looking after yourself so that you are in a better frame of mind when you spend quality time with friends and family.

(Tara, talk about how you feel when you haven’t managed to fit any drawing in your day compared to when you have)

SANDRA
It’s understandable that you might not be able to spend as much time on your creativity if you’re not earning anything from it, but that doesn’t make it any less of an important thing to you.

So, this is where time management comes in. You need to fit your art into small pockets of time wherever you can find them, such as lunch breaks, the commute to work, waiting in the car, or before breakfast. That’s where getting up an hour earlier is so good. You can devote that one hour every day to your art and feel no guilt whatsoever because you’d usually be in bed. And it’s surprising how quickly you get used to a new routine.

TARA
And that guilty feeling can apply even if we are earning from our craft.

Even if you are a full time creative and you are earning, you can feel guilty because you enjoy your work, when other people around you don’t. We’re almost programmed to believe that we shouldn’t enjoy our work, so when we do, it can make us feel like it’s wrong somehow.

SANDRA
Because there is no guarantee your work will sell, it can feel like you should be doing other things

Particularly when you are a writer, you can feel guilty because you need plenty of alone time and it can take months to get something finished and yet there is no guarantee that the book will make any money at all.

TARA:
It can even COST us money. Publishing a book costs money and there is no guarantee as Sandra said, that it will make the costs involved back, let alone make money on top. And the same applies to other forms of art.

Painting can be an expensive business. Canvases and paints don’t come cheap, so there is that added feeling of guilt that your spending money which you might not get back… and you definitely won’t if it’s a hobby.

But everything costs money. If you think about it, there is very little we do that we enjoy that doesn’t have a cost of some sort.

SANDRA
You might feel guilty making art if your family are also wanting some of your time, or if they have nothing to do.

 

This is when setting aside some time when everyone works on their creative pastime or hobby can help. Or when they are watching something on TV you don’t like?

TARA
But sometimes we just have to make sacrifices such as time with friends and family in order to get better at what we do. This applies particularly if you intend to make it a career. And sometimes they just have to accept that.

Just because we feel guilty about it, doesn’t mean we should.

SANDRA
It’s important to make your family understand how important it is to you and what it means you and that you will be a better person as a happier contented person and this can only benefit them too.

TARA:

You could always try involving your friends and family somehow.

For example, why not ask a friend if they will sit for you while you practice drawing portraits?

Or maybe your spouse will let you practice life drawing!

SANDRA

Or you can even ask them to help you think of ideas so they feel more like a part of your creativity, rather than just an onlooker.

If you’re a writer you could ask for ideas on how to develop your story. If you’re a painter you could ask for ideas on subjects. I’ve found my family to be really useful in this way.

TARA

We can feel guilty if others are having a bad time. Almost like we should feel bad about doing something pleasurable.

(Talk about your own experience of this if you have experienced it.)

Sandra I know that last year you had a really long block and it was only after we interviewed Jake Parker in episode 18 that you realised that it your block was a result of guilt.

Can you tell everyone about that?

SANDRA

Talk about the above

TARA:

Ultimately guilt does nothing for us. If you are a creative person, you need to create and you shouldn’t feel guilty about it. The people who care about you wouldn’t want you to feel that way.

And the people that don’t, don’t matter!

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

Read out answers

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-hearted and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 39 Creative Chat with Artist, Illustrator and Sketchbook Revival Creator Karen Abend

ep39 podcast Karen Abend Artist Illustrator Sketchbook Revival Creator

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is Karen Abend from www.karenabend.com. Karen is an artist and illustrator who licenses her work. You may also know her as the creator of Sketchbook Revival, a free online event which has run for the last two years. Sketchbook Revival brings together a group of art teachers to share their ideas and inspiration for filling up your sketchbook.

Walking map of Acicastello by Karen Abend

Walking map of Acicastello, Sicily digital illustration (where Karen lives)

Karen talks about

  • How her creative journey began
  • How she transitioned from the field of art conservation to creating her own art
  • What subjects she likes to draw and why
  • Her process for creating art
  • How she got started with art licensing and now licenses her greeting card designs
  • How and why she came up with the idea for Sketchbook Revival
  • Tips for building a sketchbook practice

The course Karen mentions where she learned about art licensing is by Lilla Rogers www.makeartthatsells.com

Vintage sewing pattern by Karen Abend

Vintage sewing pattern (digital design)

Artists that Karen mentions:

Karen Abend Suffragette Sisters digital illustration

Suffragette Sisters digital illustration

Find out more about Karen Abend

You can find out more about Karen and see her art and illustration on her website www.karenabend.com

Karen is hoping to run another Sketchbook Revival next year so sign up for her newsletter to get notified

 

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 38 Art Experimentation – Breaking Out of Your Comfort Zone

podcast Ep 38 Art Experimentation

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about the importance of experimenting with your art and daring to break out of your comfort zone. But you might be asking yourself why is that even important at all? If you’re happy with how you paint, what’s the point in mixing things up?

But it’s very easy to stick to what you know because you want to master one technique… and there is nothing wrong with that, but by never experimenting with new techniques and mediums, not only could you be missing out on a whole lot of fun, but you might be denying yourself the opportunity to evolve as an artist.

We also talk about a new project we are launching called the “Rediscover Your Art” Sketchbook project to encourage more people to create art. You can find out more about the project here.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • That there are degrees/levels of experimentation, you don’t have to go from high realism to throwing paint about.
  • Simple experimentation ideas to get you started
  • Using unusual tools
  • Sandra has a weird idea about using painting with body parts!!!? And tells the story of the artists she saw on TV
  • Collage ideas, we also have an Art Kick Sunday Video about this
  • Drawing with different media – there are new materials coming out all the time which we discover in our Facebook Group. I mention water-soluble wax pastels and water-soluble oil pastels.
  • Drawing over different backgrounds

Plus there must have been a lot more as this is a long one

Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

This week’s creative question

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

(keep ’em clean)

Art Question wildest art materials

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:

Welcome to today’s episode where Tara and I will be talking about why it’s good to experiment with your art techniques and also ways to help you break out of your comfort zone.

But before we go any further, we just want to say thank you for some new reviews we’ve noticed pop up on iTunes.

So the most recent ones are from:

Bit lumpy – And I’m so sorry I don’t know your real name

And he or she says…

Incredibly useful inspiring podcast
Just started listening and finding the ideas really inspiring and motivational. Loving this find!

Then we have

I’m in saine – Who of course Deb Saine

And she says…

“facing your art fears”
some of my favorite episodes are ones exactly like this one – just you two chatting about this and that: creating, of course, but also bras and panties, being strapped to a chair, olives, words like gouache and juxtaposition, saying cupboard instead of closet, fizzy drink instead of soda or pop, pronouncing ecology with a long e …

i love humor and people who have a sense of humor … and you two just always manage to make me laugh 🤭 😆 😂 … and enlighten and inform me about all kinds of things creative…

i also love the fact that you both are stellar artists who don’t take themselves too seriously … thank you both from the bottom of my heart! 😘 you don’t know how much you and this podcast and the fb group mean to me … and how you sometimes serve as a life preserver… and yes, still manic … 5.6.19

TARA

We also had a nice review from…

Glenn478

Episode 29
You two have great chemistry together.

K80fab

Says…

Love this podcast
Funny, practical, down-to-earth, and so encouraging. I love listening to this podcast. I am also engaged with the Kick community on Facebook and Instagram, so they become like friends. I am slowly working my creative life into engaging more and more with the challenges they present each month. They really have had an impact on my growth as an artist.

SANDRA:

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

Catherine Slater’s copy of Toulouse Lautrec’s The Salon in the Rue de les Moulins”

Claire Dunpy who has shared an urban sketch she had done of the Riverside Festival in Leicester

John Munro who got invited to the BBC Writers Room

TARA:

Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

You could mention the sketchbook idea

SANDRA

In today’s episode, we talk about the importance of experimenting with your art and daring to break out of your comfort zone. But you might be asking yourself why is that even important at all? If you’re happy with how you paint, what’s the point in mixing things up? And I used to ask myself the same question.

But it’s very easy to stick to what you know because you want to master one technique… and there is nothing wrong with that, but by never experimenting with new techniques and mediums, not only could you be missing out on a whole lot of fun, but you might be denying yourself the opportunity to evolve as an artist.

And we’re not talking about changing your style. We’re talking about ways to play alongside it, to have a bit of fun and discover a part of your creativity that you might not even know exists.

TARA

There are degrees of breaking out of your comfort zone – if you normally paint or draw realistically,  you don’t suddenly have to throw paint around. You could just change a little at first, maybe change subject matter or experiment with colour or use a palette knife rather than a fine brush

SANDRA

If never went to art school, one of the first things they will get you to do is experiment with simple mark-making and I remember doing this myself.

Explain what you do.

Talk about the video  – will put that one up this week.
TARA

Try experimenting with unusual tools – twigs, cotton buds, your fingers

Create your own tools – I did this in college. I vaguely remember making painting brushes from bits of string and twigs.

SANDRA

Paint with body parts?

If you are scared of doing anything too drastic, try your usual style, but perhaps over collage – simply stick bits of paper down and draw straight over or you can stick them down and paint over them with white acrylic or gesso so the elements are more subtle through the white. Use this as a base for painting over the top.

Talk about my recent attempts with collage

TARA

Mention the Collage video with my ‘unusual’ backgrounds.

Try cutting up bits of magazines and arranging them. You could collage or use them as a starting point for inspiration for a drawing (talk about the characters from chopped up magazine video). Talk about the experiment I have been meaning to try to create abstract faces.

Or you could simply Draw/paint on a different surface, even switching to work on a toned or coloured paper can make a change for your work.

SANDRA

Mention the woman on TV who drew charcoal figures on large sheets of newspaper and framed them. The figures looked really interesting, but the probably wouldn’t have had they been drawn on white paper.

TARA

Use a white pen on black paper. Try a scraperboard.

SANDRA

I hate the above idea!

But I do enjoy drawing in reverse – ie covering the paper with charcoal and drawing with a rubber.

TARA

Do you know what new art materials are out there – It never ceases to amaze me the new materials that are readily available now, that weren’t years ago. In our group, people talk about materials that I’ve never heard of and I have to ask what they are.
SANDRA

It’s easy to get comfortable with one thing and stick to that, but sometimes it’s good to persevere with something even if you don’t like it at first.

Explain how I hated the brush pen, but now I like it.

TARA

When you try one experiment you may find that it leads you to another.
I started using a pen and water brush for 5 minute march and then experimented with it for abstract faces and drawing outside. After using the face distortion app for showing how you could create a caricature, I realised there were other ways I could use it as a starting point for some faces I created with wax pastel.

SANDRA

Combine different materials – what combinations of materials could you try.  Some are a no-no, such as acrylic over oils, but oil pastels and watercolour could make a great combination, or soft pastels too. But you can experiment with all sorts of mediums.
TARA

I keep seeing charcoal and watercolour together and thinking how much I like it and that’s something I want to try. Carrie Brummer in an upcoming podcast talks about how she combines embroidery and painting.
SANDRA

Start or join a group so you pick up different ideas and techniques from others

TARA

Start a challenge with a friend to do something new. You could both take an online course together and learn something new or simply set yourself something to try for. Mention this is what started Kick in the Creatives off

SANDRA

Join a challenge – Talk about some of the people who tried lino-cutting for the first time for linovember as an example and how some of them carried on afterwards because they liked it so much.

TARA

I had never really done much in the way of abstract, but enjoyed creating semi-abstract faces for the challenge. Talk about how it got easier after the first experiments.

Set yourself constraints. Constraints can help you make interesting pictures. For example, you could create an image using entirely diagonal lines (talk about constraints video)

SANDRA

Change your scale – miniature/massive images. This is not as easy as it might sound. Talk about having to scale up that big marble painting.

TARA

Change the size of the brush you use. A larger brush will force you to be looser
SANDRA

If you normally paint from photos, paint from life
TARA

Get outside and draw – first steps could be just in your own garden and then venture further.

SANDRA

Sketch different things to the things you paint – Sandra talk about how you paint still life but you don’t draw it.
TARA

Try drawing or painting something you don’t think you like doing now and again. You can always try doing it in a different way
SANDRA

Respond to above

Keep it fun and don’t think any of this is about changing your style… But by experimenting, you can develop it.

TARA
Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. Do you ever feel guilty for spending time creating, and if so, what do you feel like you should be doing instead?

SANDRA
nordljusart – Absolutely not, but I permanently feel guilty for not spending enough time or no time at all creating…

TARA
lynnquireartist – Yes. There are times I do. Usually I feel like I should be spending time with the hubs or working on my business. The working on my business guilt I usually sometimes counter because I am actually trying to create more so I can eventually expand the business with surface design. But with the hubs time, it has been a struggle. I am trying very hard to restructure my days so creative time is built in and not taking over some other area of my life.

SANDRA
danny._chen. – I feel that the act of me drawing is not economically productive and I feel guilty about that.and other times I feel like I should be “experiencing life ” instead of doing bad drawings. But I feel better after finishing it.

TARA
jolakedraart – I don’t feel guilty! I feel sad that there’s enough time in a day to do everything that I like and need to do.

SANDRA
lorileegue – cleaning up the house, doing yard work… so many things I ‘should’ do …

2d1 likeReply

TARA
laeryel – No, I feel guilty if I’m not creating or training drawing. It’s the opposite

SANDRA
katiekarcheski – I feel like I should be focussing on the selling part more. I love creating… It’s my escape but a lot of the time I waste worrying if it will be good enough and how to make it sell.

TARA
truthinlove_2001 – I felt like I should be organizing at one point, but my Mom passed away recently and now I feel guilty doing any crafting and I’m not really sure why

SANDRA
Russila Moodley Initially yes….but soon realized that being creative brought me into true alignment with body,mind and spirit!I

It became my interpretation of “chop wood , carry water” and has helped me to cope with the most mundane of tasks💫💫💫

TARA
Deb Elen I never feel guilty about it because I know if I don’t make time to be creative I will become miserable and depressed. I do it to keep myself happy and on an even keel. It’s usually only time I would have wasted looking at social media or something anyway.

SANDRA
Mary Flynn Sometimes because I should be cleaning the house, but as soon as I walk into my studio that guilt goes away.

TARA
Rebecca Reynolds I feel a little bit guilty, as perhaps I should be doing housework… But my hubby is very supportive and encourages me! He’s a good un.

SANDRA
John Munro I never feel guilty it’s my Passion / hobby. Time Management helps.

My Beloved watches her soaps so I write in a separate room ( both happy )

Use my mobile phone whilst travelling to jot down ideas for expansion ( no I don’t drive and use my mobile )

TARA
Morwhenna Woolcock Sometimes and there’ll be lots of other things I think I ‘should’ be doing – which actually when I think about it are other creative things or exercise/ getting out walking or on my bike. Think it has something to do with my concept of time!

SANDRA
Dorothy Walker I never feel guilty doing arty things or gardening. My kids are playing poker, creating music, playing instruments, writing poetry or listening to music. No guilty feelings for anyone here! 😆😆

TARA
Krista Crescenzo I never feel guilty once I am doing it but I do feel guilty thinking about it sometimes. So then I feel I have to do the things I need to do first. Even though creating feels like a need too.

SANDRA
Mummsy Savo Never.. I’d have to go to Tesco with Himself 😂

TARA
Bradley Burgin Yes! Everything seems to be neglected in my mind. That is why I usually don’t create until most everyone is down for the night. Even then, I think I should be doing something more “productive.”

SANDRA
Meoc Artdis Yes and no. When I’m creating I want to create other stuff, such as comics, other pieces or write. But that creating gets in the way of homework, and chores.

TARA
Nea Edmans Housework

SANDRA
Angela Murphy Nea do like me and sweep the room with a glance 🤣🤣🤣🤣

TARA
Linda Butler I hate to say this, as my husband is supportive but I. Do feel guilty sometimes.

.

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a review on itunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

 

Also, you can now subscribe to our Weekly Youtube video if you want to learn something creative every Sunday and see Tara and I making complete fools of ourselves at the same time!


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 37 Creative Chat with Artist and Teacher Carrie Brummer

podcast Carrie Brummer Artist and Teacher

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s guest is Carrie Brummer from www.artiststrong.com. Carrie was originally an art teacher in school but then moved into a more administrative position. She started a blog about art in her spare time and discovered that people all over the world wanted to learn to draw and paint. That blog later became known as www.artiststrong.com where Carrie formed a community and taught people to draw through her online courses.

Barbara painting Artist Carrie Brummer

Barbara by Carrie Brummer – background features 200 hours of embroidery

Barbara Embroidery Detail

Close up of embroidery

Carrie talks about:

  • Her journey to becoming an artist
  • Her process of creating art – Carrie likes to include embroidery in her paintings
  • How she switched from teaching art in school to teaching online
  • How she started and developed her online community ‘Artist Strong’
  • Tips for how you can improve your drawing or painting
  • Tips on building a creative habit

The book Carrie mentions about people building their skills to become an expert  is “Peak by Anders Ericsson” Carrie used this theme as a basis for her free challenge “Drawing Drills

The author that Carrie mentions who writes about putting aside a small amount of time a day is Sam Bennett. Her book is called “Get It Done: From Procrastination to Creative Genius in 15 Minutes a Day

Some of Carrie’s favourite artists are Mark Rothko, Ashley Longshore and CJ Hendry

Find out more about Carrie Brummer

You can find out more about Carrie at her website www.artiststrong.com where you can also find her Free Resources, Drawing Bootcamp and The Circle, an Art Mastermind Community

You can see more of Carrie’s paintings at her art website www.carriebrummer.com

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Buy us a coffee!

Love what we do? Support us by buying us a coffee.

Sign up for our Newsletter

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

Buy us a coffee!

Love what we do? Support us by buying us a coffee.

Sign up for our Newsletter

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

Buy us a coffee!

Love what we do? Support us by buying us a coffee.

Sign up for our Newsletter

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This