Ep 42 Knowing When a Piece of Art is Finished

Ep 42 Knowing when a Piece of Art is Finished

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As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

Sandra wasn’t entirely sure it was Da Vinci, but we’ve checked it now… Phew…she was right

Today we are talking about how to recognise when your piece of art is ready to be abandoned. Not knowing when to stop can be the difference between a beautiful piece of work, and something that is overworked and almost sterile.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • How timed sketches might help you decide what’s important (Sandra loves these 😉 )
  • The idea of timed intervals for your work
  • What you need to stand back and look at your work
  • Leaving your work and coming back with fresh eyes
  • The idea of one of our group members for how to make copies of your drawings to paint
  • How different media make a difference to how much you can rework your art
  • Why if you start thinking about things to add to your work, you might already have gone too far
  • The idea of using a mirror, not to look at your gorgeous face (mwah, mwah) but the reflection of your art in it

This week’s creative question

Q. What’s most important to you, the creative process or the outcome and why?

Q What's most important to you the creative process or the outcome?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 42:
Knowing When Your Piece of Art is Finished.
(Record 07/08, airs 19/08)

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Podcast Reviews

Firebolt_cal

Love these Girls!

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“This podcast is full of down to earth art banter. Tips and creative information. Great guests and I love visiting the website and being involved in the challenges.”

TARA:
Falling in Love

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“Hello… so glad I found these ladies! So fun and gobs of information!! On top of it all, they have an amazing website with challenges, how to videos and more! My top three podcasts now! A MUST for any creative! Thank you!!”

momoffourkings via Apple Podcasts · United States of America · 07/17/19

SANDRA
Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Maybe you could mention the postcard swap and how great it was to see people in the group connecting?

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Sketching trip – Brighton

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

Tell everyone about the T-shirts and notebooks on amazon?

SANDRA

As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

So today we are talking about how to recognise when your piece of art is ready to be abandoned, to avoid overworking your art.

And that is something we see a lot in the art world. I’ve been very guilty of it myself in the past, certainly in my sketchbook, although thankfully I have gone more the other way these days I think.

But not knowing when to stop can be the difference between a beautiful piece of work, and something that is overworked and almost sterile.

TARA

You and I have always been very different in our approach in that you have always loved to get lost in detail, whereas I bore easily. But I think there is a happy medium because I’ve always wished I had more patience, whereas you’ve always wanted to be looser in your approach. But I think through working together creatively for so long, we have both changed a lot in that way.

Talk about how you have changed
Talk about how you’ve noticed a difference in my own approach to sketching

SANDRA

I’m talking specifically about sketching because I’ve no wish to change my style of painting, but yes, I think partly it’s us doing a lot together including trips out dedicated to sketching and also the fact that I do it so much more than I used to and I think that’s where confidence comes in to it.

Once you are comfortable with making mistakes and just playing with lines until they are right, you will naturally end up with a looser and more energetic piece.

The hardest part then is knowing where to stop.

TARA

One of the reasons I like timed sketches is that they don’t give you time to fiddle around and overwork. Even if you are working on a more detailed piece, setting timed intervals to make yourself stand back and look at what stage you’re at might help.

Elaborate

SANDRA
.

Of course, as you know, I hate doing timed sketches, but when I have no pressure, I can easily create a sketch in a minute or two now because I just don’t over think it anymore. I’ve learned that it’s a big mistake to go back to a sketch and add something to it. Once you start, you’re on the way to losing it’s energetic and spontaneous feel.

TARA:

I did a black and white semi-abstract face drawing in my sketchbook recently. I really liked it, but then decided to try adding colour. But it tried adding colour and it didn’t work. it doesn’t really matter as it was just a sketch and my sketchbook is for trying things. But I think the moral is, if you like something leave it.

Elaborate

Talk about the suggestion in our group to create a copy to paint.
Talk about interesting suggestions in upcoming interview with Barbara Johansen Newman

SANDRA

Less is usually more. Some of my favourite sketches are the ones where I haven’t even added a face. For the most part, when it comes to sketching, you’re aiming to express the feel of the scenario, rather than the perfect image of what you’re looking at.

TARA

Some media is much easier to overwork that others. With acrylic you can keep adding layers, but with watercolours it’s much easier to make a muddy mess, so you need to be more careful.

SANDRA

Suggest going in much stronger than you think with watercolour and using only transparent colours

When it comes to my paintings I have learned over time that when I lay a brushstroke that doesn’t make a difference for better or for worse, that’s usually the time to stop.

If I’m in doubt, I stop, turn it against a wall and look at it a week later with fresh eyes. If nothing is immediately obvious, then I leave it right there.

TARA

If I like how something is looking that’s usually time to stop.

But it can be interesting to photograph your work in stages, then even if you do take things too far you can learn from your mistakes and see where you should have stopped.

SANDRA

If in doubt, leave it out.

Turn your painting to the wall and don’t look at it for at least a week.

Explain how this helps.

TARA:

When I am working on a design piece and I start to think about what can I add to make this work, I know I need to stop and rethink. It’s the same with art once you get to the point where you think what else can I add to this to make it work you’ve usually gone too far.

SANDRA

One common mistake artists often make is they stay too close to their art as the work without stepping right back.

Explain why stepping back and viewing from a distance is a good idea.

TARA

The good thing is, the more you do, the more confident you will become in your choices and where you choose to finish.

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

SANDRA
Julie Kitzes Waking up at 7am, wandering over to my desk, and hopping straight into about five different projects before I even eat or shower.

TARA
MJ Stead Up by 7, coffee, shower, dog park and paint in the studio from 12-12:30 – 5 or 6pm. I often go back in to paint after dinner too.

SANDRA
Ben King Up at 630 with my now 1 year old son, work by 8, draw during lunch from noon to 1pm, home by 5, baby in bed around 830-9, a little more drawing of I’m not prepping a lesson.

TARA
Nik TayTay West Wake. Stretch: timed sketches. Flex: wip. Cardio: commissions. Endurance: graphic design. Torture: Etsy listings. Play: photography. Relaxation: doodles. Sleep.

SANDRA
Mummsy Savo Wake, shower volunteer work at local Hospiscare shop, check phone, look for inspiration. After dinner cooked by Himself cover the table with all my materials and start straight into a drawing

TARA
Veena Madhu Work from 9-5:30ish, trying to fit creative activities around it 🙂 spend train rides either messing on music apps or listening to instrumentals and writing lyrics to them. Some graphic design study at night, some drawing/ painting on weekends. Ideally would like them to go hand in hand, one art form inspiring another.

SANDRA
Colin Pidgeon Up 6.30. Work 8-4.30 (paint at lunchtime sometimes), home to chores, sort oout kids etc. Paint from 9.30 – 1am or so. Go to bed with bleary eyes and a sore back…

TARA
Deb Saine art! art! and then, more art!

SANDRA
Susan Simon Sweetlineart I get the brushes I love and the watercolors, cut 90 lb hot press into a small sheet and paint a dog

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What’s most important to you? The creative process or the outcome and why?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Before we go, we just want to mention the challenges we have coming up for September

Read them out.

SANDRA:
Sketchathon September
So it’s September already and that Sketchbook that you promised yourself you would fill this year has gathered an entire inch of dust, each page remaining completely blank. Well now is the time to change that! We are challenging you to fill at least one page of your sketchbook every day throughout the month. The object here is to form a sketching habit and to finally make that sketchbook something interesting to look at!

TARA:
Quotember
Introducing our brand new, motivational challenge, Quotember.

We are challenging you to create an inspirational quote, using unusual text, such as calligraphy, or your own unique font style, every day throughout the month of September.

Imagine how many people you will inspire with your words each day, including yourself!

This is the challenge to help you train your mind, and others, to think more positively.

SANDRA:
Quick Kick September
“Quick Kicks” are our monthly creative challenges that you can complete in 15 minutes or less per day. For ‘Quick Kick September’ we are challenging you to create a blind contour drawing/painting every day of the month. To create a blind contour drawing simply decide on your subject. This could be anything you like: a still life, a friends face or something in a reference photo. Then draw your subject by studying it carefully but DO NOT look at your paper as you draw.

TARA:
Kicktime September

KickTime is our monthly challenge designed for those creatives who would prefer to sink their teeth into one big project over the whole month, rather than to take part in lots of smaller ones.

And it’s designed for any kind of creative project. We will give you a prompt each month and you can use it to inspire a story, a poem, a piece of art, a piece of music, an animation, a film, a screen play… The list is endless!

The best part is that you get to work on any creative project, which is inspired by that word, for a whole month. This months prompt is “Metal”

SANDRA

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-hearted and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 41 Creative Chat with Mixed Media Artist Deb Weiers

ep 41 Podcast with Mixed Media Artist Deb Weiers

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is Deb Weiers from www.debweiersart.com @debweiersart. Deb is a mixed media artist based in Red Deer Canada who creates amazing semi-abstract faces. Her art is incredibly distinct and she uses a very intuitive approach to create her art. It was seeing Debs Faces that inspired me to try creating a few semi-abstract faces myself for our Abstract Art April Challenge.

Always Contemplating 11x15

Always Contemplating (11″ x 15″)

In this podcast Deb talks about:

  • Her background and how she got started with art
  • How she got started painting faces, a subject that initially she didn’t like
  • Her process for creating paintings starting with abstract marks
  • How she developed her distinctive style and ideas for developing your own
  • Her favourite art materials
  • Selling her work via Instagram
Girl With Dog 10x12

Girl With Dog (10″ x 12″)

The art class that got Deb into painting faces

Let’s Face it by Kara Strachan Bullock Art

Artists Deb admires

Deb’s Book

Deb has recently released a book featuring her work, called the Many Faces of Deb

Amazon UK | Amazon US

She Was Not Sure About Her New Boyfriend 10x14

She Was Not Sure About Her New Boyfriend (10″ x 14″)

Find out more about Deb Weiers


A big thank you to Deb Saine in our Facebook Group for introducing us to Deb Weiers Work and suggesting some of the questions.

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 40 Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it

Ep 40 Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about why artists and writers often live with guilt and how to overcome it. Although everyone can feel guilty at times, the problem for creatives is that they tend to get a double dose. Artists and writers can feel guilty when they are creating and yet they can also feel guilty when they’re not. So this is where finding a balance is really important.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • Some of the things that we feel might feel guilty about as creatives
  • Suggestions for fitting in your creative pursuit in ways that you can be guilt-free – eg. getting up earlier
  • Why art and creativity can improve our mood and well being which means that we are a happier person to be around
  • Why the cost of creating art shouldn’t make you feel guilty
  • Why you still might feel guilty even if your art/writing is your career
  • Ideas to get your family involved – including drawing your partner/spouse naked (Sandra’s enlightened idea 🙂)

This week’s creative question

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

Podcast Question What does your typical creative day look like?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 39:
Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it.

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:
Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

SANDRA
In today’s episode, we talk about why artists and writers often live with guilt and how to overcome it.

Although everyone can feel guilty at times, the problem for creatives is that they tend to get a double dose. Artists and writers can feel guilty when they are creating and yet they can also feel guilty when they’re not. So this is where finding a balance is really important.

So we are going to look at why we feel guilty, the main things that make us feel guilty and ways that we can create a balance and overcome those feelings.

TARA

I think one of the things that make us feel guilty is because what we do is fun. We enjoy it.

It’s an odd thing that we should feel like that, but a lot of people around us can make us feel that what we are doing is frivolous compared to other stuff we have to do.

And because of this, you can end up putting your art or writing right at the bottom of the pile, as a lower priority than the other things we ‘should’ be doing.

But this is a mistake. Often the things that we ‘should’ be doing, really can wait. Whereas our creativity demands a certain amount of self-discipline and consistency.

SANDRA
One of the most obvious things that we need to do is household chores. If the dishes have piled up or you know the hoovering needs to be done, we know that we are going to feel really bad when everyone gets home to find it hasn’t been done, but instead, you have finished a chapter of the book you are writing or an illustration you needed to finish.

But the thing about the housework is that a few hours after you’ve done it, it needs to be done again! It’s a constant thing we have to keep on top of. But a book doesn’t write itself, and once it’s done, it’s done and you can get on to the next thing.

Obviously, I’m not saying we shouldn’t clean our homes. But we should certainly put that lower down on the list of priorities. We can do that anytime!

TARA

You could get up an hour before everyone else does, I remember someone doing early rise August last year and said it had competency changed things for them.

Elaborate on the above. Talk about when you tried it.

Sandra you once did that too.

What did you do with that extra time?

SANDRA
.

I’ve continued getting up an hour earlier than I need to and I still do it now.

Sometimes I use it to do some sketching and other times I’ll use it to do whatever chores need doing so I’ll have time for creativity later on in the day when I’d normally be doing housework.

I’ve even used that time to prepare the dinner for later on so I  can look forward to doing some creative work later instead of having to cook.

TARA:
If your art is a hobby, don’t make the mistake of thinking it’s a low priority.

Art and any kind of creativity is not only something you enjoy but often something that helps with general well-being and mood.

Think of it as looking after yourself so that you are in a better frame of mind when you spend quality time with friends and family.

(Tara, talk about how you feel when you haven’t managed to fit any drawing in your day compared to when you have)

SANDRA
It’s understandable that you might not be able to spend as much time on your creativity if you’re not earning anything from it, but that doesn’t make it any less of an important thing to you.

So, this is where time management comes in. You need to fit your art into small pockets of time wherever you can find them, such as lunch breaks, the commute to work, waiting in the car, or before breakfast. That’s where getting up an hour earlier is so good. You can devote that one hour every day to your art and feel no guilt whatsoever because you’d usually be in bed. And it’s surprising how quickly you get used to a new routine.

TARA
And that guilty feeling can apply even if we are earning from our craft.

Even if you are a full time creative and you are earning, you can feel guilty because you enjoy your work, when other people around you don’t. We’re almost programmed to believe that we shouldn’t enjoy our work, so when we do, it can make us feel like it’s wrong somehow.

SANDRA
Because there is no guarantee your work will sell, it can feel like you should be doing other things

Particularly when you are a writer, you can feel guilty because you need plenty of alone time and it can take months to get something finished and yet there is no guarantee that the book will make any money at all.

TARA:
It can even COST us money. Publishing a book costs money and there is no guarantee as Sandra said, that it will make the costs involved back, let alone make money on top. And the same applies to other forms of art.

Painting can be an expensive business. Canvases and paints don’t come cheap, so there is that added feeling of guilt that your spending money which you might not get back… and you definitely won’t if it’s a hobby.

But everything costs money. If you think about it, there is very little we do that we enjoy that doesn’t have a cost of some sort.

SANDRA
You might feel guilty making art if your family are also wanting some of your time, or if they have nothing to do.

 

This is when setting aside some time when everyone works on their creative pastime or hobby can help. Or when they are watching something on TV you don’t like?

TARA
But sometimes we just have to make sacrifices such as time with friends and family in order to get better at what we do. This applies particularly if you intend to make it a career. And sometimes they just have to accept that.

Just because we feel guilty about it, doesn’t mean we should.

SANDRA
It’s important to make your family understand how important it is to you and what it means you and that you will be a better person as a happier contented person and this can only benefit them too.

TARA:

You could always try involving your friends and family somehow.

For example, why not ask a friend if they will sit for you while you practice drawing portraits?

Or maybe your spouse will let you practice life drawing!

SANDRA

Or you can even ask them to help you think of ideas so they feel more like a part of your creativity, rather than just an onlooker.

If you’re a writer you could ask for ideas on how to develop your story. If you’re a painter you could ask for ideas on subjects. I’ve found my family to be really useful in this way.

TARA

We can feel guilty if others are having a bad time. Almost like we should feel bad about doing something pleasurable.

(Talk about your own experience of this if you have experienced it.)

Sandra I know that last year you had a really long block and it was only after we interviewed Jake Parker in episode 18 that you realised that it your block was a result of guilt.

Can you tell everyone about that?

SANDRA

Talk about the above

TARA:

Ultimately guilt does nothing for us. If you are a creative person, you need to create and you shouldn’t feel guilty about it. The people who care about you wouldn’t want you to feel that way.

And the people that don’t, don’t matter!

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

Read out answers

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-hearted and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 39 Creative Chat with Artist, Illustrator and Sketchbook Revival Creator Karen Abend

ep39 podcast Karen Abend Artist Illustrator Sketchbook Revival Creator

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is Karen Abend from www.karenabend.com. Karen is an artist and illustrator who licenses her work. You may also know her as the creator of Sketchbook Revival, a free online event which has run for the last two years. Sketchbook Revival brings together a group of art teachers to share their ideas and inspiration for filling up your sketchbook.

Walking map of Acicastello by Karen Abend

Walking map of Acicastello, Sicily digital illustration (where Karen lives)

Karen talks about

  • How her creative journey began
  • How she transitioned from the field of art conservation to creating her own art
  • What subjects she likes to draw and why
  • Her process for creating art
  • How she got started with art licensing and now licenses her greeting card designs
  • How and why she came up with the idea for Sketchbook Revival
  • Tips for building a sketchbook practice

The course Karen mentions where she learned about art licensing is by Lilla Rogers www.makeartthatsells.com

Vintage sewing pattern by Karen Abend

Vintage sewing pattern (digital design)

Artists that Karen mentions:

Karen Abend Suffragette Sisters digital illustration

Suffragette Sisters digital illustration

Find out more about Karen Abend

You can find out more about Karen and see her art and illustration on her website www.karenabend.com

Karen is hoping to run another Sketchbook Revival next year so sign up for her newsletter to get notified

 

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 38 Art Experimentation – Breaking Out of Your Comfort Zone

podcast Ep 38 Art Experimentation

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about the importance of experimenting with your art and daring to break out of your comfort zone. But you might be asking yourself why is that even important at all? If you’re happy with how you paint, what’s the point in mixing things up?

But it’s very easy to stick to what you know because you want to master one technique… and there is nothing wrong with that, but by never experimenting with new techniques and mediums, not only could you be missing out on a whole lot of fun, but you might be denying yourself the opportunity to evolve as an artist.

We also talk about a new project we are launching called the “Rediscover Your Art” Sketchbook project to encourage more people to create art. You can find out more about the project here.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • That there are degrees/levels of experimentation, you don’t have to go from high realism to throwing paint about.
  • Simple experimentation ideas to get you started
  • Using unusual tools
  • Sandra has a weird idea about using painting with body parts!!!? And tells the story of the artists she saw on TV
  • Collage ideas, we also have an Art Kick Sunday Video about this
  • Drawing with different media – there are new materials coming out all the time which we discover in our Facebook Group. I mention water-soluble wax pastels and water-soluble oil pastels.
  • Drawing over different backgrounds

Plus there must have been a lot more as this is a long one

Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

This week’s creative question

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

(keep ’em clean)

Art Question wildest art materials

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:

Welcome to today’s episode where Tara and I will be talking about why it’s good to experiment with your art techniques and also ways to help you break out of your comfort zone.

But before we go any further, we just want to say thank you for some new reviews we’ve noticed pop up on iTunes.

So the most recent ones are from:

Bit lumpy – And I’m so sorry I don’t know your real name

And he or she says…

Incredibly useful inspiring podcast
Just started listening and finding the ideas really inspiring and motivational. Loving this find!

Then we have

I’m in saine – Who of course Deb Saine

And she says…

“facing your art fears”
some of my favorite episodes are ones exactly like this one – just you two chatting about this and that: creating, of course, but also bras and panties, being strapped to a chair, olives, words like gouache and juxtaposition, saying cupboard instead of closet, fizzy drink instead of soda or pop, pronouncing ecology with a long e …

i love humor and people who have a sense of humor … and you two just always manage to make me laugh 🤭 😆 😂 … and enlighten and inform me about all kinds of things creative…

i also love the fact that you both are stellar artists who don’t take themselves too seriously … thank you both from the bottom of my heart! 😘 you don’t know how much you and this podcast and the fb group mean to me … and how you sometimes serve as a life preserver… and yes, still manic … 5.6.19

TARA

We also had a nice review from…

Glenn478

Episode 29
You two have great chemistry together.

K80fab

Says…

Love this podcast
Funny, practical, down-to-earth, and so encouraging. I love listening to this podcast. I am also engaged with the Kick community on Facebook and Instagram, so they become like friends. I am slowly working my creative life into engaging more and more with the challenges they present each month. They really have had an impact on my growth as an artist.

SANDRA:

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

Catherine Slater’s copy of Toulouse Lautrec’s The Salon in the Rue de les Moulins”

Claire Dunpy who has shared an urban sketch she had done of the Riverside Festival in Leicester

John Munro who got invited to the BBC Writers Room

TARA:

Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

You could mention the sketchbook idea

SANDRA

In today’s episode, we talk about the importance of experimenting with your art and daring to break out of your comfort zone. But you might be asking yourself why is that even important at all? If you’re happy with how you paint, what’s the point in mixing things up? And I used to ask myself the same question.

But it’s very easy to stick to what you know because you want to master one technique… and there is nothing wrong with that, but by never experimenting with new techniques and mediums, not only could you be missing out on a whole lot of fun, but you might be denying yourself the opportunity to evolve as an artist.

And we’re not talking about changing your style. We’re talking about ways to play alongside it, to have a bit of fun and discover a part of your creativity that you might not even know exists.

TARA

There are degrees of breaking out of your comfort zone – if you normally paint or draw realistically,  you don’t suddenly have to throw paint around. You could just change a little at first, maybe change subject matter or experiment with colour or use a palette knife rather than a fine brush

SANDRA

If never went to art school, one of the first things they will get you to do is experiment with simple mark-making and I remember doing this myself.

Explain what you do.

Talk about the video  – will put that one up this week.
TARA

Try experimenting with unusual tools – twigs, cotton buds, your fingers

Create your own tools – I did this in college. I vaguely remember making painting brushes from bits of string and twigs.

SANDRA

Paint with body parts?

If you are scared of doing anything too drastic, try your usual style, but perhaps over collage – simply stick bits of paper down and draw straight over or you can stick them down and paint over them with white acrylic or gesso so the elements are more subtle through the white. Use this as a base for painting over the top.

Talk about my recent attempts with collage

TARA

Mention the Collage video with my ‘unusual’ backgrounds.

Try cutting up bits of magazines and arranging them. You could collage or use them as a starting point for inspiration for a drawing (talk about the characters from chopped up magazine video). Talk about the experiment I have been meaning to try to create abstract faces.

Or you could simply Draw/paint on a different surface, even switching to work on a toned or coloured paper can make a change for your work.

SANDRA

Mention the woman on TV who drew charcoal figures on large sheets of newspaper and framed them. The figures looked really interesting, but the probably wouldn’t have had they been drawn on white paper.

TARA

Use a white pen on black paper. Try a scraperboard.

SANDRA

I hate the above idea!

But I do enjoy drawing in reverse – ie covering the paper with charcoal and drawing with a rubber.

TARA

Do you know what new art materials are out there – It never ceases to amaze me the new materials that are readily available now, that weren’t years ago. In our group, people talk about materials that I’ve never heard of and I have to ask what they are.
SANDRA

It’s easy to get comfortable with one thing and stick to that, but sometimes it’s good to persevere with something even if you don’t like it at first.

Explain how I hated the brush pen, but now I like it.

TARA

When you try one experiment you may find that it leads you to another.
I started using a pen and water brush for 5 minute march and then experimented with it for abstract faces and drawing outside. After using the face distortion app for showing how you could create a caricature, I realised there were other ways I could use it as a starting point for some faces I created with wax pastel.

SANDRA

Combine different materials – what combinations of materials could you try.  Some are a no-no, such as acrylic over oils, but oil pastels and watercolour could make a great combination, or soft pastels too. But you can experiment with all sorts of mediums.
TARA

I keep seeing charcoal and watercolour together and thinking how much I like it and that’s something I want to try. Carrie Brummer in an upcoming podcast talks about how she combines embroidery and painting.
SANDRA

Start or join a group so you pick up different ideas and techniques from others

TARA

Start a challenge with a friend to do something new. You could both take an online course together and learn something new or simply set yourself something to try for. Mention this is what started Kick in the Creatives off

SANDRA

Join a challenge – Talk about some of the people who tried lino-cutting for the first time for linovember as an example and how some of them carried on afterwards because they liked it so much.

TARA

I had never really done much in the way of abstract, but enjoyed creating semi-abstract faces for the challenge. Talk about how it got easier after the first experiments.

Set yourself constraints. Constraints can help you make interesting pictures. For example, you could create an image using entirely diagonal lines (talk about constraints video)

SANDRA

Change your scale – miniature/massive images. This is not as easy as it might sound. Talk about having to scale up that big marble painting.

TARA

Change the size of the brush you use. A larger brush will force you to be looser
SANDRA

If you normally paint from photos, paint from life
TARA

Get outside and draw – first steps could be just in your own garden and then venture further.

SANDRA

Sketch different things to the things you paint – Sandra talk about how you paint still life but you don’t draw it.
TARA

Try drawing or painting something you don’t think you like doing now and again. You can always try doing it in a different way
SANDRA

Respond to above

Keep it fun and don’t think any of this is about changing your style… But by experimenting, you can develop it.

TARA
Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. Do you ever feel guilty for spending time creating, and if so, what do you feel like you should be doing instead?

SANDRA
nordljusart – Absolutely not, but I permanently feel guilty for not spending enough time or no time at all creating…

TARA
lynnquireartist – Yes. There are times I do. Usually I feel like I should be spending time with the hubs or working on my business. The working on my business guilt I usually sometimes counter because I am actually trying to create more so I can eventually expand the business with surface design. But with the hubs time, it has been a struggle. I am trying very hard to restructure my days so creative time is built in and not taking over some other area of my life.

SANDRA
danny._chen. – I feel that the act of me drawing is not economically productive and I feel guilty about that.and other times I feel like I should be “experiencing life ” instead of doing bad drawings. But I feel better after finishing it.

TARA
jolakedraart – I don’t feel guilty! I feel sad that there’s enough time in a day to do everything that I like and need to do.

SANDRA
lorileegue – cleaning up the house, doing yard work… so many things I ‘should’ do …

2d1 likeReply

TARA
laeryel – No, I feel guilty if I’m not creating or training drawing. It’s the opposite

SANDRA
katiekarcheski – I feel like I should be focussing on the selling part more. I love creating… It’s my escape but a lot of the time I waste worrying if it will be good enough and how to make it sell.

TARA
truthinlove_2001 – I felt like I should be organizing at one point, but my Mom passed away recently and now I feel guilty doing any crafting and I’m not really sure why

SANDRA
Russila Moodley Initially yes….but soon realized that being creative brought me into true alignment with body,mind and spirit!I

It became my interpretation of “chop wood , carry water” and has helped me to cope with the most mundane of tasks💫💫💫

TARA
Deb Elen I never feel guilty about it because I know if I don’t make time to be creative I will become miserable and depressed. I do it to keep myself happy and on an even keel. It’s usually only time I would have wasted looking at social media or something anyway.

SANDRA
Mary Flynn Sometimes because I should be cleaning the house, but as soon as I walk into my studio that guilt goes away.

TARA
Rebecca Reynolds I feel a little bit guilty, as perhaps I should be doing housework… But my hubby is very supportive and encourages me! He’s a good un.

SANDRA
John Munro I never feel guilty it’s my Passion / hobby. Time Management helps.

My Beloved watches her soaps so I write in a separate room ( both happy )

Use my mobile phone whilst travelling to jot down ideas for expansion ( no I don’t drive and use my mobile )

TARA
Morwhenna Woolcock Sometimes and there’ll be lots of other things I think I ‘should’ be doing – which actually when I think about it are other creative things or exercise/ getting out walking or on my bike. Think it has something to do with my concept of time!

SANDRA
Dorothy Walker I never feel guilty doing arty things or gardening. My kids are playing poker, creating music, playing instruments, writing poetry or listening to music. No guilty feelings for anyone here! 😆😆

TARA
Krista Crescenzo I never feel guilty once I am doing it but I do feel guilty thinking about it sometimes. So then I feel I have to do the things I need to do first. Even though creating feels like a need too.

SANDRA
Mummsy Savo Never.. I’d have to go to Tesco with Himself 😂

TARA
Bradley Burgin Yes! Everything seems to be neglected in my mind. That is why I usually don’t create until most everyone is down for the night. Even then, I think I should be doing something more “productive.”

SANDRA
Meoc Artdis Yes and no. When I’m creating I want to create other stuff, such as comics, other pieces or write. But that creating gets in the way of homework, and chores.

TARA
Nea Edmans Housework

SANDRA
Angela Murphy Nea do like me and sweep the room with a glance 🤣🤣🤣🤣

TARA
Linda Butler I hate to say this, as my husband is supportive but I. Do feel guilty sometimes.

.

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a review on itunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

 

Also, you can now subscribe to our Weekly Youtube video if you want to learn something creative every Sunday and see Tara and I making complete fools of ourselves at the same time!


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 37 Creative Chat with Artist and Teacher Carrie Brummer

podcast Carrie Brummer Artist and Teacher

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Today’s guest is Carrie Brummer from www.artiststrong.com. Carrie was originally an art teacher in school but then moved into a more administrative position. She started a blog about art in her spare time and discovered that people all over the world wanted to learn to draw and paint. That blog later became known as www.artiststrong.com where Carrie formed a community and taught people to draw through her online courses.

Barbara painting Artist Carrie Brummer

Barbara by Carrie Brummer – background features 200 hours of embroidery

Barbara Embroidery Detail

Close up of embroidery

Carrie talks about:

  • Her journey to becoming an artist
  • Her process of creating art – Carrie likes to include embroidery in her paintings
  • How she switched from teaching art in school to teaching online
  • How she started and developed her online community ‘Artist Strong’
  • Tips for how you can improve your drawing or painting
  • Tips on building a creative habit

The book Carrie mentions about people building their skills to become an expert  is “Peak by Anders Ericsson” Carrie used this theme as a basis for her free challenge “Drawing Drills

The author that Carrie mentions who writes about putting aside a small amount of time a day is Sam Bennett. Her book is called “Get It Done: From Procrastination to Creative Genius in 15 Minutes a Day

Some of Carrie’s favourite artists are Mark Rothko, Ashley Longshore and CJ Hendry

Find out more about Carrie Brummer

You can find out more about Carrie at her website www.artiststrong.com where you can also find her Free Resources, Drawing Bootcamp and The Circle, an Art Mastermind Community

You can see more of Carrie’s paintings at her art website www.carriebrummer.com

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 36. The Pros & Cons of Turning your Creative Passion into your Career

Ep 36 turning your passion into your career

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In today’s episode, we talk about the pro’s and cons of turning your passion into your career. We both have quite strong feelings about this topic. Sandra has a non-creative part-time job, which she sometimes resents when she’s rather be painting or working on Kick in the Creatives. However, there is also a positive side to that non-creative job which she discusses in the podcast. I’ve worked as a graphic designer all my working life, so you could say I turned my passion for art into my career, however, it has never really satisfied me creatively.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • How having a creative job can kill your original creative passion (I know this well)
  • How if  you get it right you’ll feel like you’re never working
  • How it can be hard creating things “to order”
  • How you can hone your skill and learn new skills while someone else is paying
  • How you can end up creating things you’re really not interested in.
  • How working for yourself can be great as you get to set your own hours
  • How a creative job can help push you out of your comfort zone

Oh and somehow we got talking about the time I worked in a place where the sister company Photoshop retouched men’s top-shelf magazines. I must have lapsed and forgotten we were recording then! (Hopefully, Sandra has edited some of that out)

This week’s creative question

Q. Do you ever feel guilty for spending time creating, and if so, what do you feel like you should be doing instead?

Do you ever feel guilty for spending time creating - question

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 36:
The Pro’s & Cons of Turning your Passion into your Career
(Record 15/05 – airs 27/05)

SANDRA:

Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Laura McKenzie Atkins‎
Karen Thornton‎
Sheryll Martin

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:

Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

SANDRA

In today’s episode, we talk about the pro’s and cons of turning your passion into your career.

I have mixed feelings about this because aside from my art and KITC, I do actually have a non-creative job, all be it part-time. And there are times when I really resent being there because I would much rather be focussing solely on my artwork and what we do with Kick in the Creatives.

But when I really think about it, there is actually a positive side to having a job outside of my creativity as well as a few negative ones.

But being that we always like to end on a high, let’s talk about the cons of being a full-time creative first and then move on to the pro’s. And then we’ll look at ways that you can have the best of both worlds.

TARA

Well, first of all, I want to talk about what happened to me when I became a graphic designer because it actually ended up destroying my passion for drawing.

Elaborate on the above
Explain how you managed to get the spark back

SANDRA

You may have to spend a lot of your time creating things that you don’t really want to. For example, if I relied on my paintings for my sole income, I would have to take on commissions that I might not enjoy at all and having made that mistake in the past, this isn’t something that works for me at all and it can leave me not wanting to even paint.

TARA

You have to change things because someone else says they don’t like it
You have to change things even when you know it looks terrible

Elaborate on the above
SANDRA

You may have to paint what’s selling rather than just paint what you feel like. That in itself can be an issue because then you might not be being true to yourself as an artist.

Elaborate on the above
TARA

If you are selling something of a certain style, it might be hard to break out of that, even if you want too
It’s harder to find the time to experiment for fun and perhaps even evolve as you might have otherwise

SANDRA

You have to create, even when you don’t feel like it

This can be really hard and can even show in your work if it’s forced or you’re in the wrong mindset

There is a lot of self-discipline involved, so you have to treat it like any other job. You have to show up, whether you feel like it or not.
TARA

There is more pressure because you have to make money
It’s not a guaranteed income
If you work for yourself there will be dry spells

SANDRA

50% will be marketing

TARA

So let’s move on to the pros of turning your creativity into a full-time career.

You get to do what you love all day and you get paid for it

SANDRA

You can hone your skills while someone else pays for it

TARA

If you get it right you could feel like you never work a day in your life
SANDRA

Although a huge amount of self-discipline is involved, you get to choose your own hours.
TARA

You’re more likely to create things you wouldn’t otherwise and so you can develop skills that you might not have
SANDRA

But as we said at the beginning. It is a risk. It’s not guaranteed income, so how can we get the best of both worlds?

Try having a part-time job and having your art as a side job

TARA

If you do have a job that is not fulfilling do your own self driven creative projects on the side
Have a creative job (or business) but not exactly the same as what you love. For example, we are enjoying KITC, but that’s because it’s not just about painting and drawing. It involves podcasting and video and running a group
SANDRA

Could you use your skill in a different way ie. Could you create the art you want, but then teach online/in person to make money
Or could you license your work or sell it on printed items like t-shirts (again this takes a lot of marketing
TARA

To make sure you get the type of work you like you could decide you are only going to do a certain type of work and go after that type of client, eventually get rid of the rest

Remember, if you are going to have a creative job, make sure it’s the right one for you, not one that you think you should do or fall into.

Sometimes when you have always wanted to do something arty or creative as a job it’s hard to see beyond that or alternatives.
SANDRA

You could make sacrifices and downgrade… Explain
TARA
Finally read out the answers to our previous question…
The question was…

Q. Where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

SANDRA

Lorileegue Hopefully I will still be learning and experimenting with new things
TARA

Sherylpond3gmail.com9364 I hope to go from my sketchbook to paintings in acrylic and have a creative group to meet with once a week!
SANDRA

John Munro Writing TV Drama

TARA

Angela Murphy Probably still in a Care home but I might be drawing on the furniture 🤦🏻‍♀️
SANDRA

Iaras Belen I have no idea ): that is my struggle
TARA

Mary Flynn Well I’m hoping to retire from my teaching job and become a full-time artist . I would love to write and illustrate a children’s book.

SANDRA

Gabriela Popp Earning enough money by selling art. The art classes are only for fun…. I’m dreaming

TARA

Nea Edmans I’d like my arty business to be thriving. To maybe have an actual shop in my city.

SANDRA

Debra Crary Still painting, possibly like Renoir with my kids or hubby tying my brushes to my hands or maybe finger printing or playing with my gelli plate, but still making art. There’s no stopping me!

TARA

Alan Green Like now, but better. And working less hours. And making more money. And being more famous. And not having to rush out in the mornings to go teach. And having green hair and being a little more eccentric. Maybe wearing wacky clothes. Apart from all that, like now but better 🙂

SANDRA

Dorena Belle Petty I have a complete vision. I’m in my studio which is full of light, surrounded by Large works in progress. There are finished paintings hanging high on the walls and I’m being interviewed by a journalist with a cameraman. My assistant is working away on the business computer in her office. It’s so clear to me, the building, the skylights, even the interviewer’s clothes!
TARA

Meoc Artdis Hopefully animating for some company and creating comics

SANDRA

Catherine C Slater Probably much the same as now. I’d like to think I’d still be doing lots of creative stuff, trying new ideas, learning new things and taking risks – even at 76! Alan I might join you with the green hair!

TARA

Filipina Pate I see myself writing and illustrating children’s picture books and graphic novels. I create prints and posters that make it easier to share my work with a wide audience. And I make commissioned paintings to help heal and encourage people who are sick or need help in hospitals or other healthcare settings.

SANDRA

Juul Mulder I want to be living from my creativity but will be starving probebly 😉😂

TARA

Christi C Neff Hopefully doing this full time since I’ll finally be retired. Maybe I’ll actually sell something.
SANDRA
Frank J Ferrer-
Hopefully right where I am but as a better improved artist. I have a great full time job as a graphic designer where I get to create something almost every day in a field that I love. I am also an artist in my heart and soul and before or after work every day and every chance I get, I am turned around at my drawing table with my back to my computer and drawing, painting or just doing anything creative and learning, improving and practicing my drawing skills. When I was younger I never thought I would be here doing this but here I am and I couldn’t hope for anything more and now appreciate every moment of it. Sorry for the ramble.

Bradley Burgin I always want to improve. Some days it feels like I’ve gone 5 years backward. But that is the process. Hopefully selling some and still enjoying this “process”. LOL

TARA
Dorothy Walker Hopefully, still alive and producing something every day, good, bad and indifferent.
SANDRA

Sheryll Martin
Hoping to be retired down at a beach in either America or England follow Gods lead
Writing painting creating
Odd stuff…loving my life
Published poet ..
TARA
Mummsy Savo I would like to think I will have faith in my ability to encompass all art styles without fear of failure x and hopefully still creating every day – just for me

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. Do you ever feel guilty for spending time creating, and if so, what do you feel like you should be doing instead?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a eview on itunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

Also, you can now subscribe to our Weekly Youtube video if you want to learn something creative every Sunday and see Tara and I making complete fools of ourselves at the same time!


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 35. Creative Chat with Author Jacqui Penn aka Penny Appleton

podcast - creative chat with author Jacqui Penn

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Today’s guest is Jacqui Penn, also known by her pen name, Penny Appleton. Jacqui is the mother of the well-known writer and creative entrepreneur Joanna Penn (The Creative Penn) who we interviewed in episode 20, which you can listen to here.

Jacqui spent much of her life travelling and teaching. Since retiring she has now become a successful author in her own right, using her many life experiences to inspire her sweet romance novels. Jacqui only began her writing career in recent years having been encouraged by her daughter Joanna. Having initially worked alongside Joanna, she is now ‘peddling her bike on her own.’

Jacqui talks about:

  • What made her decide to have a pen name instead of using her real name
  • How she comes up with her storylines
  • How difficult it was to have her first writing draft cut in half, to work for the sweet romance market
  • How she comes up with her characters and how they take on their own life
  • How she’s journaled all of her life and uses those as inspiration in her writing
  • Why she decided to independently publish instead of taking the traditional route

Jacqui also offers advice to anyone who has always “meant” to write a book but has never got round to it.

Find out more about Jacqui Penn

You can find Jacqui’s books on her website www.pennyappleton.com and under her pen name Penny Appleton at Amazon

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
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Ep 34. Facing Your Art Fears

Ep 34 Facing You Art Drawing and Painting Fears

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In today’s episode, we talk about why it’s important to face your fears and draw or paint what you think you can’t. It’s all too easy to stay well within our comfort zone, but daring to break out of it is an important part of being an artist. And what’s the worst that can happen? Well if your fear is drawing deadly venomous snakes from life, quite a lot. Apart from that a bad drawing or painting is not the end of the world (I’d just stick to fluffy bunnies and butterflies or drawing those snakes from a photo)

Some of the things we discuss:

  • How you can sometimes really surprise yourself.
  • How Sandra tackled the subject she was most afraid of right at the start
  • How you might be holding yourself back from progressing by avoiding your fears
  • Why sometimes we are afraid to start a piece of art because we have built it up in our heads
  • Why comparing yourself to others is not a good way to judge your art
  • Why you shouldn’t be afraid of getting out there and trying an art class or workshop

We also talk about the crucial “olive test”, that you should use when trying out a new medium. You’ve heard of the “olive painting test”, right? Probably not as we made it up, but it could really be true.

This week’s creative question

Q. Where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Bradly Burgin
Johanna Brown
Cassie Nobbs
Sheryll Martin

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:
Respond to above.

Talk about my painting going off to Belgium and my Prints

Talk about the videos

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA
Respond to above

Talk a bit more on the videos
SANDRA
In today’s episode, we talk about why it’s important to face your fears and draw what you think you can’t. It’s all too easy to stay well within our comfort zone, but daring to break out of it is an important part of being an artist.

TARA
By trying something you think might be really hard, you can sometimes really surprise yourself. You’ll never know what you are capable of until you try it.

SANDRA
Talk about how I began painting glass straight away because I thought it would be a good idea to tackle what I was most afraid of right at the start… and how it became my favourite subject to paint,

TARA
By avoiding what you are scared of, you’re only holding yourself back from progressing and you can find your art at a standstill. So if you are at a point where you are feeling ‘stuck in a rut,’ then it might be a sign that it’s time to push yourself.

SANDRA
Sometimes it can be more about being scared of feeling like a ‘beginner’ again. But you can’t learn without getting over that hurdle.

TARA:
Sometimes it can be more about fear of the end result. When you’re trying something different, it’s bound not to be your best work to begin with, and you have to accept that, because it’s all part of the learning process.

SANDRA
Remember, failure is not the opposite of success, but a stepping stone to success.

TARA
It might be that you’re afraid that you may never be good (enough) whatever standard you judge that by. But one way of making that a certainty is if you don’t try at all.

Something most artists are guilty of is comparing themselves to other, more experienced artists, but the reality is that they were once where you are and it took a lot of practice and failures to hone their skill.

SANDRA
I’ve always been afraid to draw in a cartoony style because there is a certain expectation of me now. But recently I’m experimenting outside of my online stuff and it’s fun.

TARA:
You need to work out what is ‘fear’ and what is something that you just don’t like drawing, the only way you can do that is try it. And sometimes you assume you won’t enjoy something, but when you actually try it, you can feel really different.

SANDRA

There’s nothing more disheartening than spending hours or even days of your time on something that ends up going in the bin. But those pieces are never wasted… You will always have learned really valuable lessons from them and you go into your next piece armed with that little bit more knowledge.

TARA

Fear that you are wasting time, what would people think, should you really be doing something else.

Fear that other people may not like your art if you decide to share it.

You’re scared that your expectations exceed your current ability, which could lead to disappointment and negative feedback if you share.

Suggest that people listen to a previous episode on ‘Dealing with Negative Feedback’
SANDRA
Fear of starting – we procrastinate so much, whether that’s deciding what to draw or because we have an idea we want to get out. the problem might be that you have a perfect image in your head that you are scared to ruin that.

TARA:
I was like this with recent paintings. I still have one in my sketchbook that I am holding back on creating in case it doesn’t look good.

Some people are scared are trying certain mediums, for example watercolour. You will hear how tricky it is and that can put you off. Sometimes I wonder if my dislike of acrylic paint is caused by the fact it slows me down because of my lack of experience. If I put the time in maybe I would like it more, and break that barrier. – When I was a kid I really did not want to use colour, I think this stemmed from someone saying they preferred my black and white pencil drawings. But of course this was only really the case because I did them more and so had more practice.

SANDRA
I used to paint with watercolours because I was afraid of oils – The mediums all sounded so complicated. When my friend finally persuaded me to give them ago, I never looked back. They don’t have to be as complicated as they seem.

TARA
Fear of being able to follow something you have just created. When you create something you like, sometimes it’s scary trying to repeat that in case the next one doesn’t work

SANDRA
Fear/worry of going to an art class or workshop – Sometimes the unknown is far worse than reality, even if people are better than you they’ll generally just try and offer advice.

TARA:

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What is the best piece of art advice you have ever received?

SANDRA
Dorothy Walker “Experiment and do original things. Don’t copy other’s work, such as in tutorials, but let yourself be inspired by them.”

TARA:
Deb Saine never compare your work with someone else’s … bad art happens, so move on … you learn more from mistakes …

SANDRA
Cybel Gonzalez Nin Don’t give up, just try another medium!

TARA:
Carol Vasenko Never give up! Especially on a piece you think is hopeless. Keep going. You can turn it around.

SANDRA
Mary Flynn Don’t be afraid to make the darks really dark

TARA:
Mary Flynn Don’t take rejection personally, if you don’t get accepted into a show don’t take it personally

SANDRA
Sheryll Martin Try new things all your life

And life will take you on an adventure..art is a new thing for me and I am enjoying the adventure

TARA:
Mummsy Savo To be proud of my accomplishments and post my work for feedback all thanks to KitC and the support of the group I’m never now embarrassed x

SANDRA
Sue Colter Lesch Great artists were beginners once, you are seeing their work after years of practice.

TARA:
Kim Hine The same one I am giving Miss five year old … look for the shape of things and draw those. Learning that has made my art more accessible.

SANDRA
Flottefort “It is only a piece of paper. …if you fail you can throw it away ” from my drawing teacher

TARA:
Dorena Belle Petty Actually it’s a quote that I read recently. ‘I don’t wait for the muse, the muse waits for me. I just show up.’ Akiane Kramarik, child prodigy who started painting at age 4. She said this at about 9 years old. She is an amazing artist! This really struck a chord with me, too often I wait for the muse, or the weekend or until the dishes are done.

SANDRA:
queeniexcviiKeep practicing and don’t focus on your style. Get the basics down and through your practice your style will emerge just keep practicing.

TARA
Laughingoutloudatuorme Redoes are ok! Keep at it.. Just never through it away & quit!

SANDRA:
King_ah_england” Don’t stare at it for too long, if your over thinking it take a break and come back to it later” -My Wife @vannessa.l.king

TARA:
gorgebikefitter”Let go of expectations and outcomes. Play.” That and a version of something said above, “It’s only paint and a canvas. What’s the worst that can happen?”

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. Where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Before we go, we just want to mention the challenges we have coming up for May.

So, first of all, we have a brand new challenge, ‘Blooming Marvellous May.

We are challenging you to create a piece of flower art, every day throughout May. You can use any medium you like such as paint, embroidery, clay, printing, digital or mixed media… You can even use actual flowers!

SANDRA:

We also see the return of ‘Miniature May.

We are challenging you to create a miniature piece of artwork, no more than 5 x 5 inches, every day throughout the month of May.

TARA:

We have Quick Kick May.

“Quick Kicks” are our monthly creative challenges that you can complete in 15 minutes or less per day.

For ‘Quick Kick May’ we are challenging you to create a simple drawing using your non-dominant hand, every day throughout the month of May.

This challenge stimulates the ‘creative’ side of our brains by using our ‘wrong’ hand. Studies have shown that when using our dominant hand, only one hemisphere of the brain is active, however by using our non-dominant hand, both sides of our brain are active.

SANDRA:

And finally, we have Kick Time May.

Kick Time is our monthly challenge designed for those creatives who would prefer to sink their teeth into one big project over the whole month, rather than to take part in lots of smaller ones.

And it’s designed for any kind of creative project. We will give you a prompt each month and you can use it to inspire a story, a poem, a piece of art, a piece of music, an animation, a film, a screen play… The list is endless!

The best part is that you get to work on any creative project, which is inspired by that word, for a whole month!

We will give you a brand new prompt word at the beginning of every month to use as your inspiration. The work for May is ‘Evolution.’

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-heatred and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 33. Using Art to Convey a Message or Story

Ep 33 Using Art to Convey a Message or Story

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about using art to convey a message. Art can be used to say something you want to express without having to actually say it. This could be anything from expressing your emotions to telling a story.

This is a special episode because it kicks off the start of a podcast relay. We have tagged two of our own favourite creative podcasts, which are the ‘Your Creative Push’ podcast, hosted by Youngman Brown and the ‘3 Point Perspective’ illustration podcast, hosted by Jake Parker, Will Terry and Lee White. They will then share their own thoughts on our topic on one of their future episodes. They, in turn, will tag another creative podcast to do the same… and so on.

But back to this episode. Today we talk about

  • How you can use your own experiences in your work
  • How you can put a twist on your own experiences and add humour
  • How creating art from something that annoys you could make you feel better
  • How choosing a well thought out title might add another dimension/extra interest to your work
  • How you can subconsciously put a message in your work, but not realise until you are finished.
  • How you can create art that has a meaning to you, but no one else has to know unless you want them to

Do you ever put a message or story in your work?

Somehow we also end up talking about family not putting dirty washing away and toilet roll tubes – sorry!

This week’s creative question

Q. What is the best piece of art advice you have ever received?

best creative advice question

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:

Welcome to the show.

Thanks to everyone who’s been sharing their work with us on social media

This is a special episode, because we are starting a podcast relay where we will tag two of our favourite podcasts an ask them to share their views on “Using Art to Convey a Message”. We are tagging Youngman Brown from Your Creative Push and the  Illustration podcast “3 Point Perspective” with Jake Parker, Will Terry and Lee White to share their views on the topic

Talk about the work that’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:

Respond to above.

I just want to remind everyone that the prompts we provide are optional. We seem to get a lot of people apologising for going off prompt, but that really doesn’t matter at all. They are only there if you are running out of inspiration

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

(mention the videos we have uploaded so far to Youtube)

SANDRA

In today’s episode, we talk about ways of conveying a message or a story through your art.

This can be anything from saying something you feel the need to say without having to actually say it; in other words a way of expressing a message or your feelings. To creating a piece that tells its own story. And everything in between.

We see it all the time don’t we; a painting of an object, maybe a still life or something and there is nothing more to it than that. It’s simply art that matches the decor.

And there is nothing more to it than that, but art can be so much more multi-layered than that, and a painting can have a much deeper meaning behind it, often something only the artist knows.

Or sometimes there is a more obvious story. And sometimes you’re just not sure and it leaves you asking questions. And I really like those ones in particular; the ones where you can almost create your own story.

Mention the painting I saw once of a woman embracing a man but looking elsewhere

Do you ever create a story in your own work Tara?

TARA

Not usually no. But I have drawn on my own experiences in the past and created fun things off the back of it.

It doesn’t necessarily have to be deep and meaningful…

For example…

Share your rabbit story (and any others)
Post-it cartoons

What about you Sandra? Do your paintings all have a meaning behind them?

SANDRA

I always find that when I paint something that has a story behind it, it turns out better than the ones that don’t and I think that’s because I’ve invested a little bit more of myself into the piece.

But not all of them have any meaning, no.

For example, I paint a lot of reflective things purely because I love capturing the play of light.

I once painted a raw egg and obviously, that was simply because I fancied painting a raw egg! But when I do paintings like that, I always try to give them their own story in the title. (Your Place or Mine).

TARA

Some stories are only clear at all when you see the title

Ask Sandra for some examples of titles she has come up with for those types of paintings

SANDRA

Apple – Not a Banana
Sweets – Toothache and Denture Venture
Cup with lipstick – Evidence

As obvious creative people as Artists are, I’m always really disappointed when I walk around a gallery and find paintings that are titled things like ‘Still life with apples’ or titles that are so literal. I can’t believe that they can’t come up with something more creative than that!

I find titling a painting to be as much fun as I do painting it!

The type of art you create Tara is more geared towards amusing stories, so I don’t suppose you need to title it do you?

TARA

No, but an idea for a series of drawings did pop in my head at the weekend which would have a message that would run through them, if it works.

Talk about the cartoon you made about running out of ideas so you’ve got to execute them
Talk about the cartoon strip you made of how we met on the Podcast
Other examples?

So what paintings have you done that have a deeper meaning behind them, Sandra?

SANDRA

I’ll talk a little bit about Light-fingered

I’ll talk a little bit about the lost bear story

Then…

I always say I have a light side and a dark side in my painting and I’m still trying to work out why that is. But I go through periods of both.

Whether that reflects my personality (I am a Gemini) I’m not sure… But maybe that’s just a pretentious way of looking at it!

So does your work change according to mood?

TARA

Respond to above

While I believe that some art is made to convey a message, sometimes I think that some artists have to come up with a message for their art in order for it to be more saleable, because that’s what is expected. I think art can be a bit pretentious like that sometimes

But it’s true that the way you feel can reflect in the work you produce.

SANDRA

But a lot of people stop creating when they feel depressed, but actually it can help to instead do more.

If you think about ‘Adele’ and the Album she wrote off of the back of her break up, she was literally splurging her own feelings out in words and out of that came some of her most popular songs.

And in the same way, other art forms can help you to document your thoughts and feelings when going through a darker period in your life.

TARA

Talk about art journaling and how it can almost be like self therapy. Mention that that is how Danny Gregory helped himself through his grief when his wife died.

SANDRA

Going back to Danny Gregory, mention the sketches he recently did during his cancer treatment. Mention that we know a few others who have done the same thing.

TARA

But you can use art journaling for the more usual things in your life. For example if you’ve had a crappy day, instead of letting yourself sink into a foul mood, why not create an illustrated page about it and put an amusing spin on it? Eventually you might be able to look back and laugh about it.
Give some of possible scenario examples

When I was at college I really didn’t like one lecturer we had. He would give us weird performance type projects to do. For example to sit with a friend and one had to meow and one had to bark like you were having a conversation. He decided that we should all give some sort of performance to the class. So I wrote and read a poem about all the ridiculous thing he had made us do

SANDRA

Add a couple of possible scenarios that can be turned into something fun
Talk about the guy who made the toilet roll tube teenage instructional video – Will Ried. Instead of allowing himself to get frustrated about it, he channelled his frustration into something that turned the whole thing into something really amusing.

TARA

Art of any kind can be used in the same way, whether it’s a funny poem, a short story… You can use any of it to lighten up something that might otherwise have you tearing your hair out.

If you are having a good time you can also use Art Journaling in that way too. Imagine capturing how you felt on holiday, or on a great day out. Unlike a photo, with sketches, you can capture your personal viewpoint with notes and images and tell a story of your day/moment.

SANDRA

Equally, you can put a deeper meaning in a piece of art and nobody ever has to know it’s not purely fictional. That’s the beauty of art… Only the artist has to know the whole story. They can choose to hold some of the story back And that’s true in the ones that leave the viewer asking questions… Example ‘Who is that person waiting for in the cafe’

TARA

Although your art may not necessarily have this great big meaning, sometimes the way you make your marks can say something about how you were feeling at the time. Was it engrossed in detail and delicate, whimsical or are your marks loose and energetic? It can take you back to how you felt when you made it.
SANDRA

And like Tara said, your art doesn’t have to have any meaning at all. If you want to paint something purely because you like the look of it then there’s nothing wrong with that, but sometimes it can be more fun to create something that has some relevance or meaning to you, even if the viewer doesn’t know.

Rose – petal example
TARA

The way you put together your composition, lighting and colour can also really completely change a mood or feeling that you put over to the viewer. You can make someone feel uneasy or comfortable all by changing your viewpoint and can change the story that you are telling. In general I am not a big Superhero series fan, but I loved the series Daredevil, not only because he is the worst Superhero ever, but also the amazing lighting and colours and compositions, that completely change how you feel.

SANDRA

Yes, it’s surprising how the exact same subject can convey a completely different feel just by changing the lighting.

It doesn’t need to be obvious at all… It could be something as simple as a look in someone’s eyes or an object that has some meaning to you or something like that.

TARA

You can twist stories in unusual ways to make something ordinary funny. I like to take ordinary situations and then try and twist bits into unexpected ways to make a cartoon.

I love the way cartoonist share how they feel, in interesting ways. Such as Maureen Marzi Wilson’s Introvert Doodles. She takes simple daily things that all introverts can relate to and makes a humorous story from them. And Gemma Correll completely puts her own spin on everyday things. For example she has a cartoon about being beach body ready where one of the suggestions is to stretch your belly button until it’s large enough to hold a beer can

SANDRA

It can even be completely fictional of course and not necessarily be directly related to the artist at all.
Think about the political cartoons you see. The story isn’t related to the artist, but may convey their own point of view on a political topic.

TARA

I’ve heard some artists talk about their art not intentionally having a story, but when they finish, they realise that there are elements that relate to an aspect of their life. So subconsciously there was a message within their work even if they didn’t realise it at the time.

SANDRA

Yes, that’s happened to me. I think it’s important not to force it, but try to be open-minded and allow a painting to take you where it wants to and see what happens. Forcing it will only lead to something that looks over contrived and you really don’t want that.
TARA

Some famous artists have left secret messages within their art
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/21/ten-paintings-with-intriguing-hidden-symbols-and-messages/
For example Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa has a series of hidden letters and numbers hidden within it, and no one else knows what they mean

SANDRA

Mention the film as an example – The Da Vinci Code

TARA:

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What do you do to stay creatively motivated?

TARAJohn Munro The following helps

1. Getting old and dreading not doing something I love

2. Running a writing group

3. Challenging myself mentally, because physically I’m no longer the Olympian I always imagined I was ( I was going to say athlete, but if Break Dancing is being considered an Olympic sport then I’m an Olympian )

SANDRA
Angela Murphy Pink gin does the trick for me lol only kidding!! Well not really kidding!! Things pop into my head at all stupid times of the day and if I don’t sketch something from the nonsense my brain generates I become a nightmare to live with!! So I suppose keeping my sanity keeps me creative!!

TARA
Christi C Neff Following my quest for peace. Running from stress. Hiding in my blue room. My creativity comes from within and is essential to keeping my sanity. Vodka… occasionally only because I haven’t tried pink gin yet.

SANDRA
Otilia Heimat Sometimes I will draw without thinking, other times I read an article or a book about art. Mostly, I go to an exhibition/gallery and that’s enough to trigger ideas.

TARA
Teresa Jolliffe Cameron I start a new job tomorrow after a year off so I know that I will need to purposefully schedule time for me.

SANDRA
Gabriela Popp The challenges push me to draw every day…. and that is my start of the day.

Regularly I take part in a portrait-drawing-group without a teacher, only to spend relaxing time together and share the costs for the model…

And an upcoming exhibition makes me busy, too. In May there are three

TARA
Mary Flynn Nature always inspired me. This group inspires me. Having to wake up at 4:30 every morning to go to work is inspiring me to work harder so I can become a full time artist.

SANDRA
Anna Sellers Our family plays roleplaying games once a week which gives more art needs than I can keep up with. We play Dungeons and Dragons. Because I post some of my images for our game, I have had requests for commissions

TARA
Russila Moodley Have been creatively motivated for as long as I can remember. ..it has expressed itself in poetry,photography, painting and writing a book!!

The problem is always finding time to unleash my passion in these creative ventures😊

SANDRA
little.finnish.artist

Surround myself with art every day for example watching YouTube videos and keeping sketchbook. If I’m somehow blocked I think what I most love about art and draw something that is connected with that.

TARA
tony_ley

@kickinthecreatives – I don’t hesitate. Whether it’s a small action like jotting an idea down in my phone’s memo or scribbling on a piece of paper or just going for a walk or talking an idea out loud or using my phone to record and talk an idea out….I take ANY kind of action in the moment. Then immediately act on the idea when you get a moment. It might not work or be want you wanted and maybe you’ll come back to it later…but doing SOMETHING will always be better than doing nothing.

SANDRA
blessinks

I have a sketchbook for every idea, but sometimes I challenge myself to visually relate two random words to get my brain going. I like to letter and I follow these lovely German calligraphers. I decided to do their lettering challenge in March with a twist. I put everything into Google Translate and lettered the literal translation. That’s been a challenge. #letteringforoneyear.

TARA
inklets

Stay focused on projects already in the works and make sure to take two days off a week now from drawing. Otherwise, I get overwhelmed and frustrated.

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What is the best piece of art advice you have ever received?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Don’t forget we are tagging Youngman Brown from Your Creative Push and the  Illustration podcast “3 Point Perspective”with Jake Parker, Will Terry and Lee White to share their views on the topic, so keep an ear out for their podcast episodes too – links to their podcast will be in our show notes.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

Also, you can now subscribe to our Weekly Youtube video if you want to learn something creative every Sunday and see Tara and I making complete fools of ourselves at the same time!

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