Lip drawing tutorial for beginners – Realistic and Simplified

In this lip drawing tutorial for beginners, we demonstrate how to draw lips with a charcoal pencil. We include some tips for following the contours of the lips and how to shade lips to get a sense of roundness.

Tools Used

+ Cretacolor Nero Pencil – https://fave.co/2NmxSay
+ Blending Stump/torchon – something like this https://fave.co/2ZlGt3J
+ Pentel Brush pen – https://fave.co/2ZaRtlr

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 42 Knowing When a Piece of Art is Finished

Ep 42 Knowing when a Piece of Art is Finished

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

Sandra wasn’t entirely sure it was Da Vinci, but we’ve checked it now… Phew…she was right

Today we are talking about how to recognise when your piece of art is ready to be abandoned. Not knowing when to stop can be the difference between a beautiful piece of work, and something that is overworked and almost sterile.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • How timed sketches might help you decide what’s important (Sandra loves these 😉 )
  • The idea of timed intervals for your work
  • What you need to stand back and look at your work
  • Leaving your work and coming back with fresh eyes
  • The idea of one of our group members for how to make copies of your drawings to paint
  • How different media make a difference to how much you can rework your art
  • Why if you start thinking about things to add to your work, you might already have gone too far
  • The idea of using a mirror, not to look at your gorgeous face (mwah, mwah) but the reflection of your art in it

This week’s creative question

Q. What’s most important to you, the creative process or the outcome and why?

Q What's most important to you the creative process or the outcome?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 42:
Knowing When Your Piece of Art is Finished.
(Record 07/08, airs 19/08)

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Podcast Reviews

Firebolt_cal

Love these Girls!

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“This podcast is full of down to earth art banter. Tips and creative information. Great guests and I love visiting the website and being involved in the challenges.”

TARA:
Falling in Love

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“Hello… so glad I found these ladies! So fun and gobs of information!! On top of it all, they have an amazing website with challenges, how to videos and more! My top three podcasts now! A MUST for any creative! Thank you!!”

momoffourkings via Apple Podcasts · United States of America · 07/17/19

SANDRA
Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Maybe you could mention the postcard swap and how great it was to see people in the group connecting?

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Sketching trip – Brighton

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

Tell everyone about the T-shirts and notebooks on amazon?

SANDRA

As Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

So today we are talking about how to recognise when your piece of art is ready to be abandoned, to avoid overworking your art.

And that is something we see a lot in the art world. I’ve been very guilty of it myself in the past, certainly in my sketchbook, although thankfully I have gone more the other way these days I think.

But not knowing when to stop can be the difference between a beautiful piece of work, and something that is overworked and almost sterile.

TARA

You and I have always been very different in our approach in that you have always loved to get lost in detail, whereas I bore easily. But I think there is a happy medium because I’ve always wished I had more patience, whereas you’ve always wanted to be looser in your approach. But I think through working together creatively for so long, we have both changed a lot in that way.

Talk about how you have changed
Talk about how you’ve noticed a difference in my own approach to sketching

SANDRA

I’m talking specifically about sketching because I’ve no wish to change my style of painting, but yes, I think partly it’s us doing a lot together including trips out dedicated to sketching and also the fact that I do it so much more than I used to and I think that’s where confidence comes in to it.

Once you are comfortable with making mistakes and just playing with lines until they are right, you will naturally end up with a looser and more energetic piece.

The hardest part then is knowing where to stop.

TARA

One of the reasons I like timed sketches is that they don’t give you time to fiddle around and overwork. Even if you are working on a more detailed piece, setting timed intervals to make yourself stand back and look at what stage you’re at might help.

Elaborate

SANDRA
.

Of course, as you know, I hate doing timed sketches, but when I have no pressure, I can easily create a sketch in a minute or two now because I just don’t over think it anymore. I’ve learned that it’s a big mistake to go back to a sketch and add something to it. Once you start, you’re on the way to losing it’s energetic and spontaneous feel.

TARA:

I did a black and white semi-abstract face drawing in my sketchbook recently. I really liked it, but then decided to try adding colour. But it tried adding colour and it didn’t work. it doesn’t really matter as it was just a sketch and my sketchbook is for trying things. But I think the moral is, if you like something leave it.

Elaborate

Talk about the suggestion in our group to create a copy to paint.
Talk about interesting suggestions in upcoming interview with Barbara Johansen Newman

SANDRA

Less is usually more. Some of my favourite sketches are the ones where I haven’t even added a face. For the most part, when it comes to sketching, you’re aiming to express the feel of the scenario, rather than the perfect image of what you’re looking at.

TARA

Some media is much easier to overwork that others. With acrylic you can keep adding layers, but with watercolours it’s much easier to make a muddy mess, so you need to be more careful.

SANDRA

Suggest going in much stronger than you think with watercolour and using only transparent colours

When it comes to my paintings I have learned over time that when I lay a brushstroke that doesn’t make a difference for better or for worse, that’s usually the time to stop.

If I’m in doubt, I stop, turn it against a wall and look at it a week later with fresh eyes. If nothing is immediately obvious, then I leave it right there.

TARA

If I like how something is looking that’s usually time to stop.

But it can be interesting to photograph your work in stages, then even if you do take things too far you can learn from your mistakes and see where you should have stopped.

SANDRA

If in doubt, leave it out.

Turn your painting to the wall and don’t look at it for at least a week.

Explain how this helps.

TARA:

When I am working on a design piece and I start to think about what can I add to make this work, I know I need to stop and rethink. It’s the same with art once you get to the point where you think what else can I add to this to make it work you’ve usually gone too far.

SANDRA

One common mistake artists often make is they stay too close to their art as the work without stepping right back.

Explain why stepping back and viewing from a distance is a good idea.

TARA

The good thing is, the more you do, the more confident you will become in your choices and where you choose to finish.

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

SANDRA
Julie Kitzes Waking up at 7am, wandering over to my desk, and hopping straight into about five different projects before I even eat or shower.

TARA
MJ Stead Up by 7, coffee, shower, dog park and paint in the studio from 12-12:30 – 5 or 6pm. I often go back in to paint after dinner too.

SANDRA
Ben King Up at 630 with my now 1 year old son, work by 8, draw during lunch from noon to 1pm, home by 5, baby in bed around 830-9, a little more drawing of I’m not prepping a lesson.

TARA
Nik TayTay West Wake. Stretch: timed sketches. Flex: wip. Cardio: commissions. Endurance: graphic design. Torture: Etsy listings. Play: photography. Relaxation: doodles. Sleep.

SANDRA
Mummsy Savo Wake, shower volunteer work at local Hospiscare shop, check phone, look for inspiration. After dinner cooked by Himself cover the table with all my materials and start straight into a drawing

TARA
Veena Madhu Work from 9-5:30ish, trying to fit creative activities around it 🙂 spend train rides either messing on music apps or listening to instrumentals and writing lyrics to them. Some graphic design study at night, some drawing/ painting on weekends. Ideally would like them to go hand in hand, one art form inspiring another.

SANDRA
Colin Pidgeon Up 6.30. Work 8-4.30 (paint at lunchtime sometimes), home to chores, sort oout kids etc. Paint from 9.30 – 1am or so. Go to bed with bleary eyes and a sore back…

TARA
Deb Saine art! art! and then, more art!

SANDRA
Susan Simon Sweetlineart I get the brushes I love and the watercolors, cut 90 lb hot press into a small sheet and paint a dog

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What’s most important to you? The creative process or the outcome and why?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Before we go, we just want to mention the challenges we have coming up for September

Read them out.

SANDRA:
Sketchathon September
So it’s September already and that Sketchbook that you promised yourself you would fill this year has gathered an entire inch of dust, each page remaining completely blank. Well now is the time to change that! We are challenging you to fill at least one page of your sketchbook every day throughout the month. The object here is to form a sketching habit and to finally make that sketchbook something interesting to look at!

TARA:
Quotember
Introducing our brand new, motivational challenge, Quotember.

We are challenging you to create an inspirational quote, using unusual text, such as calligraphy, or your own unique font style, every day throughout the month of September.

Imagine how many people you will inspire with your words each day, including yourself!

This is the challenge to help you train your mind, and others, to think more positively.

SANDRA:
Quick Kick September
“Quick Kicks” are our monthly creative challenges that you can complete in 15 minutes or less per day. For ‘Quick Kick September’ we are challenging you to create a blind contour drawing/painting every day of the month. To create a blind contour drawing simply decide on your subject. This could be anything you like: a still life, a friends face or something in a reference photo. Then draw your subject by studying it carefully but DO NOT look at your paper as you draw.

TARA:
Kicktime September

KickTime is our monthly challenge designed for those creatives who would prefer to sink their teeth into one big project over the whole month, rather than to take part in lots of smaller ones.

And it’s designed for any kind of creative project. We will give you a prompt each month and you can use it to inspire a story, a poem, a piece of art, a piece of music, an animation, a film, a screen play… The list is endless!

The best part is that you get to work on any creative project, which is inspired by that word, for a whole month. This months prompt is “Metal”

SANDRA

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-hearted and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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How to Sketch Quickly to Capture the Moment

In this video, we show you how to sketch quickly to capture the moment. Sandra shares how her way of sketching has changed so it is much looser, freer and more fun. It is a complete contrast to her highly detailed still life paintings. If you want to loosen up your sketching and enjoy the process rather than worrying about the result, why not give it a try.

Tools Used

+Uni Pin waterproof pen

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

How to Start Drawing Again Even if You Haven’t Drawn for Years

how to start drawing again

You want to start drawing again, so I guess the answer is simple. Just start. But of course, our minds like to mess with us and we procrastinate and doubt ourselves.

“What if I’m rubbish?”

“What if I don’t enjoy it?”

“I’d better wait until my new sketchbook arrives.”

The first thing to know is that everyone feels like this, even experienced artist. Especially if they are experimenting and trying something new.

I have personal experience of starting to draw again. Even though I have been a graphic designer for over 20 years, I had lost my passion for drawing and no longer drew by hand any more. It was only by accident when Sandra Busby and I had a little creative challenge where we decided that we would test the theory that alcohol makes you more creative that I got the bug again. It was the act of drawing a wine bottle, all be it badly that made me realise I quite enjoyed it.

So before you read any more of this post I challenge you to grab a piece of paper. It doesn’t need to be fancy, a notepad or piece of copy paper will do. Find a pen and draw something you can see from where you are sitting. No messing about deciding what to draw. I’ll give you 30 seconds to decide. Let’s face it, this first drawing may not be a masterpiece, but you have done the hardest thing and started. When you have finished, keep your drawing it will be fun to look back on to see how you improve.

which art materials will you like when you start drawing

Are you still reading? Go and do that drawing first, then come back

Did you enjoy drawing the subject you drew? Decide now what your next drawing will be.

It could be another simple object in front of you, one of your photos or do a quick search on one of the free photo sites Unsplash or Pixabay.

Be prepared to be bad at drawing

When you start drawing again you will go through the sucky stage, everyone does. So allow yourself to be bad and don’t beat yourself up about it. Look back at your drawings in a month’s time If you’ve been drawing regularly you should start to see improvement. Try and enjoy the process of drawing rather than worrying about the end result

When you start drawing again you may not like the subjects you used to

Just because you used to love drawing still life (or whatever it was) does not mean that you will now. Allow yourself to try different subjects. I used to love drawing buildings, but now I much prefer to draw faces and people. This was something I discovered by taking part in one of our creative challenges February Faces. Had I stuck with buildings, I would have probably felt bored by now. So shake it up and try drawing different things until you discover what you like. If you run out of ideas, join a challenge, search for art prompts or use a random word generator. You could even set yourself a subject a week. So week one might be animals, week two could be landscapes etc.

Experiment with different mediums

Just like your choice in subject matter might change, so might the medium you enjoy. Maybe when you were younger you loved nothing more than to spend hours on a detailed pencil drawing. Now, that might not suit your taste or busy lifestyle. Swap the notion that you have to use a pencil and start with a pen. Or try drawing straight with colour. I’m a big fan of brush pens which let you get colour down quickly and can create great effects.

A fun thing to try is using a toned surface (like grey or tan) with black and white pens. The black pen becomes the shadow areas and the white the highlights with the grey or tan becoming the mid-tones. Another technique a beginner friend of mine enjoyed when I showed her is to draw with a water-soluble Fineline pen with a brush and water (or water-brush) to make the mid-tones/greys.

It’s ok to copy drawings and paintings when you are learning to draw

When you’re learning it’s completely ok to copy as long as you credit the creator if you choose to share it publicly. Take drawings or cartoons by artists you like and try and recreate them on the page. It’s something we all did as kids, so why not as adults?

Your drawing doesn’t have to be realistic

Remember your drawing does not have to be realistic. For example, take a look at some of the fantastic semi-abstract faces that Artist Deb Weiers creates. Quirky is good, a few wobbles make a drawing more interesting. If you want to draw something, but make it look cartoony, go for it. It doesn’t even have to look like something real, it can be completely from your head. Maybe you don’t want it to look like anything at all. Your drawing can be completely abstract or you could make patterns based on objects you see. There are no rules.

Make drawing a habit

Drawing is like the gym, it’s no good going out full force and exercising every day for a week and then nothing for the rest of the month. Pace yourself. Decide what time you can spare when you start drawing – 30 minutes every weekday, 5 minutes a day. Whatever it is try and stick with it, but don’t beat yourself up if you slip now and again. Decide before you start what your theme or goal will be for the week or month too.

make time to start drawing again

Make Yourself Accountable

Do you have a partner or friend you can make yourself accountable too? Tell them what you are doing and ask them if you can check in with them each week and share your progress. Alternatively, join a local or online art group or take part in a creative challenge. If you’re feeling brave declare what you are doing on social media and share your progress. Instagram, in particular, s a pretty kind place to be, unlike some social platforms.

You are of course welcome to join our friendly supportive Facebook group and join in with our challenges. We have artists of all levels from beginners to experienced and you can be guaranteed encouragement.

Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group


+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

How to Use Water Soluble Wax Pastels – NeoColor II Versus Lyra Aqua Color

In this video, we compare water-soluble wax pastel/crayon brands NeoColor II and Lyra Aqua Color alongside a water-soluble oil pastel made by Talens.

We also give a quick demo of how to use water-soluble wax pastels by drawing a face with Neocolor II.

What’s great about these pastels is that they give really bright punchy colours that remind us of a gouache effect.

Tools Used

+NeoColor II Water-Soluble Wax pastels

+Lyra Aqua Color Water-Soluble Wax Crayons

+Talens Art Creation Water-Soluble Oil Pastels

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 41 Creative Chat with Mixed Media Artist Deb Weiers

ep 41 Podcast with Mixed Media Artist Deb Weiers

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is Deb Weiers from www.debweiersart.com @debweiersart. Deb is a mixed media artist based in Red Deer Canada who creates amazing semi-abstract faces. Her art is incredibly distinct and she uses a very intuitive approach to create her art. It was seeing Debs Faces that inspired me to try creating a few semi-abstract faces myself for our Abstract Art April Challenge.

Always Contemplating 11x15

Always Contemplating (11″ x 15″)

In this podcast Deb talks about:

  • Her background and how she got started with art
  • How she got started painting faces, a subject that initially she didn’t like
  • Her process for creating paintings starting with abstract marks
  • How she developed her distinctive style and ideas for developing your own
  • Her favourite art materials
  • Selling her work via Instagram
Girl With Dog 10x12

Girl With Dog (10″ x 12″)

The art class that got Deb into painting faces

Let’s Face it by Kara Strachan Bullock Art

Artists Deb admires

Deb’s Book

Deb has recently released a book featuring her work, called the Many Faces of Deb

Amazon UK | Amazon US

She Was Not Sure About Her New Boyfriend 10x14

She Was Not Sure About Her New Boyfriend (10″ x 14″)

Find out more about Deb Weiers


A big thank you to Deb Saine in our Facebook Group for introducing us to Deb Weiers Work and suggesting some of the questions.

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Fun and Easy Doodle Art Ideas – Doodling Over Paper Shapes

This is a quick, easy and fun doodling exercise to try. Tear or cut out some coloured paper shapes and glue them on a sheet of white paper. Turn the paper round and see if the shapes remind you of anything.

Doodle over the top of the shapes with a black marker. I sometimes start with a continuous line drawing and then add to it, but you can work in any way you like.

If you are not sure what a continuous line drawing is, check out one of our previous videos

Tools Used

+ Coloured paper similar to this

+ Sharpie marker

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Our Interview on The Brilliant Gamble Podcast – Creativity and Balance in Life

We were delighted to be invited to be interviewed on The Brilliant Gamble Podcast, hosted by Blaire Palmer.

In this interview we talk about creativity in a broad sense – from painting to music to writing and crafts – about how important it is to make time for creativity in your life and how to get started.

If you’ve been putting your own creativity on a back burner I hope today’s show will inspire you to push it further up the list of priorities. And I’d love to know how you get on –

Blair Palmer, A Brilliant Gamble

A Brilliant Gamble Podcast

 

Watercolour Brush Pen Painting Tutorial (Stationery Island Brush Pens Review)

In this Art Kick Sunday video, we take a look at how to use watercolour brush pens. We demonstrate painting a parrot using Stationery Island Watercolour Brush pens.

These watercolour brush pens give lovely bright punchy colours and are easy and clean to use. You simply apply them like you were using markers and then use water and a brush or an aqua brush to add water in places where you would like the colours to soften or merge.

Tools Used

+ Stationery Island Watercolour Brush Pens

+ Kuretake Clean Color Real Brush Watercolour Brush Pens

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

Ep 40 Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it

Ep 40 Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about why artists and writers often live with guilt and how to overcome it. Although everyone can feel guilty at times, the problem for creatives is that they tend to get a double dose. Artists and writers can feel guilty when they are creating and yet they can also feel guilty when they’re not. So this is where finding a balance is really important.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • Some of the things that we feel might feel guilty about as creatives
  • Suggestions for fitting in your creative pursuit in ways that you can be guilt-free – eg. getting up earlier
  • Why art and creativity can improve our mood and well being which means that we are a happier person to be around
  • Why the cost of creating art shouldn’t make you feel guilty
  • Why you still might feel guilty even if your art/writing is your career
  • Ideas to get your family involved – including drawing your partner/spouse naked (Sandra’s enlightened idea 🙂)

This week’s creative question

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

Podcast Question What does your typical creative day look like?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

EP 39:
Why Artists and Writers Often Live with Guilt and How to Overcome it.

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:
Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

SANDRA
In today’s episode, we talk about why artists and writers often live with guilt and how to overcome it.

Although everyone can feel guilty at times, the problem for creatives is that they tend to get a double dose. Artists and writers can feel guilty when they are creating and yet they can also feel guilty when they’re not. So this is where finding a balance is really important.

So we are going to look at why we feel guilty, the main things that make us feel guilty and ways that we can create a balance and overcome those feelings.

TARA

I think one of the things that make us feel guilty is because what we do is fun. We enjoy it.

It’s an odd thing that we should feel like that, but a lot of people around us can make us feel that what we are doing is frivolous compared to other stuff we have to do.

And because of this, you can end up putting your art or writing right at the bottom of the pile, as a lower priority than the other things we ‘should’ be doing.

But this is a mistake. Often the things that we ‘should’ be doing, really can wait. Whereas our creativity demands a certain amount of self-discipline and consistency.

SANDRA
One of the most obvious things that we need to do is household chores. If the dishes have piled up or you know the hoovering needs to be done, we know that we are going to feel really bad when everyone gets home to find it hasn’t been done, but instead, you have finished a chapter of the book you are writing or an illustration you needed to finish.

But the thing about the housework is that a few hours after you’ve done it, it needs to be done again! It’s a constant thing we have to keep on top of. But a book doesn’t write itself, and once it’s done, it’s done and you can get on to the next thing.

Obviously, I’m not saying we shouldn’t clean our homes. But we should certainly put that lower down on the list of priorities. We can do that anytime!

TARA

You could get up an hour before everyone else does, I remember someone doing early rise August last year and said it had competency changed things for them.

Elaborate on the above. Talk about when you tried it.

Sandra you once did that too.

What did you do with that extra time?

SANDRA
.

I’ve continued getting up an hour earlier than I need to and I still do it now.

Sometimes I use it to do some sketching and other times I’ll use it to do whatever chores need doing so I’ll have time for creativity later on in the day when I’d normally be doing housework.

I’ve even used that time to prepare the dinner for later on so I  can look forward to doing some creative work later instead of having to cook.

TARA:
If your art is a hobby, don’t make the mistake of thinking it’s a low priority.

Art and any kind of creativity is not only something you enjoy but often something that helps with general well-being and mood.

Think of it as looking after yourself so that you are in a better frame of mind when you spend quality time with friends and family.

(Tara, talk about how you feel when you haven’t managed to fit any drawing in your day compared to when you have)

SANDRA
It’s understandable that you might not be able to spend as much time on your creativity if you’re not earning anything from it, but that doesn’t make it any less of an important thing to you.

So, this is where time management comes in. You need to fit your art into small pockets of time wherever you can find them, such as lunch breaks, the commute to work, waiting in the car, or before breakfast. That’s where getting up an hour earlier is so good. You can devote that one hour every day to your art and feel no guilt whatsoever because you’d usually be in bed. And it’s surprising how quickly you get used to a new routine.

TARA
And that guilty feeling can apply even if we are earning from our craft.

Even if you are a full time creative and you are earning, you can feel guilty because you enjoy your work, when other people around you don’t. We’re almost programmed to believe that we shouldn’t enjoy our work, so when we do, it can make us feel like it’s wrong somehow.

SANDRA
Because there is no guarantee your work will sell, it can feel like you should be doing other things

Particularly when you are a writer, you can feel guilty because you need plenty of alone time and it can take months to get something finished and yet there is no guarantee that the book will make any money at all.

TARA:
It can even COST us money. Publishing a book costs money and there is no guarantee as Sandra said, that it will make the costs involved back, let alone make money on top. And the same applies to other forms of art.

Painting can be an expensive business. Canvases and paints don’t come cheap, so there is that added feeling of guilt that your spending money which you might not get back… and you definitely won’t if it’s a hobby.

But everything costs money. If you think about it, there is very little we do that we enjoy that doesn’t have a cost of some sort.

SANDRA
You might feel guilty making art if your family are also wanting some of your time, or if they have nothing to do.

 

This is when setting aside some time when everyone works on their creative pastime or hobby can help. Or when they are watching something on TV you don’t like?

TARA
But sometimes we just have to make sacrifices such as time with friends and family in order to get better at what we do. This applies particularly if you intend to make it a career. And sometimes they just have to accept that.

Just because we feel guilty about it, doesn’t mean we should.

SANDRA
It’s important to make your family understand how important it is to you and what it means you and that you will be a better person as a happier contented person and this can only benefit them too.

TARA:

You could always try involving your friends and family somehow.

For example, why not ask a friend if they will sit for you while you practice drawing portraits?

Or maybe your spouse will let you practice life drawing!

SANDRA

Or you can even ask them to help you think of ideas so they feel more like a part of your creativity, rather than just an onlooker.

If you’re a writer you could ask for ideas on how to develop your story. If you’re a painter you could ask for ideas on subjects. I’ve found my family to be really useful in this way.

TARA

We can feel guilty if others are having a bad time. Almost like we should feel bad about doing something pleasurable.

(Talk about your own experience of this if you have experienced it.)

Sandra I know that last year you had a really long block and it was only after we interviewed Jake Parker in episode 18 that you realised that it your block was a result of guilt.

Can you tell everyone about that?

SANDRA

Talk about the above

TARA:

Ultimately guilt does nothing for us. If you are a creative person, you need to create and you shouldn’t feel guilty about it. The people who care about you wouldn’t want you to feel that way.

And the people that don’t, don’t matter!

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

Read out answers

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What does your typical creative day look like?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-hearted and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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