Sketching with Limited Time (Timed Drawing Practice Exercise) – Art Kick Sunday

In Today’s Art Kick Sunday we are going to look at doing short timed drawings.

It can be so easy to over-work a drawing and one way to get over this is to practice drawing with a set time limit. It can really help you to loosen up. It’s also great if you have only a limited time available to draw.

In this video, we show you how you can create a simple drawing in just 2 minutes.

Sketching in a limited time (from 2 to 10 minutes) means you can make time to be creative every day.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our Channel – http://bit.ly/KickYoutube

Materials

In this video we use:

A Pentel brush pen which you can get from Amazon
https://amzn.to/2GRMREN
(affiliate link)

A timer which is also available from Amazon
https://amzn.to/2URLCug
(affiliate link)

A cheap sketchbook from “The Works” perfect for practice, when you don’t want to feel precious about what you do.

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Ep 34. Facing Your Art Fears

Ep 34 Facing You Art Drawing and Painting Fears

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about why it’s important to face your fears and draw or paint what you think you can’t. It’s all too easy to stay well within our comfort zone, but daring to break out of it is an important part of being an artist. And what’s the worst that can happen? Well if your fear is drawing deadly venomous snakes from life, quite a lot. Apart from that a bad drawing or painting is not the end of the world (I’d just stick to fluffy bunnies and butterflies or drawing those snakes from a photo)

Some of the things we discuss:

  • How you can sometimes really surprise yourself.
  • How Sandra tackled the subject she was most afraid of right at the start
  • How you might be holding yourself back from progressing by avoiding your fears
  • Why sometimes we are afraid to start a piece of art because we have built it up in our heads
  • Why comparing yourself to others is not a good way to judge your art
  • Why you shouldn’t be afraid of getting out there and trying an art class or workshop

We also talk about the crucial “olive test”, that you should use when trying out a new medium. You’ve heard of the “olive painting test”, right? Probably not as we made it up, but it could really be true.

This week’s creative question

Q. Where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:
Welcome everyone to the show.

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Bradly Burgin
Johanna Brown
Cassie Nobbs
Sheryll Martin

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:
Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:
Respond to above.

Talk about my painting going off to Belgium and my Prints

Talk about the videos

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA
Respond to above

Talk a bit more on the videos
SANDRA
In today’s episode, we talk about why it’s important to face your fears and draw what you think you can’t. It’s all too easy to stay well within our comfort zone, but daring to break out of it is an important part of being an artist.

TARA
By trying something you think might be really hard, you can sometimes really surprise yourself. You’ll never know what you are capable of until you try it.

SANDRA
Talk about how I began painting glass straight away because I thought it would be a good idea to tackle what I was most afraid of right at the start… and how it became my favourite subject to paint,

TARA
By avoiding what you are scared of, you’re only holding yourself back from progressing and you can find your art at a standstill. So if you are at a point where you are feeling ‘stuck in a rut,’ then it might be a sign that it’s time to push yourself.

SANDRA
Sometimes it can be more about being scared of feeling like a ‘beginner’ again. But you can’t learn without getting over that hurdle.

TARA:
Sometimes it can be more about fear of the end result. When you’re trying something different, it’s bound not to be your best work to begin with, and you have to accept that, because it’s all part of the learning process.

SANDRA
Remember, failure is not the opposite of success, but a stepping stone to success.

TARA
It might be that you’re afraid that you may never be good (enough) whatever standard you judge that by. But one way of making that a certainty is if you don’t try at all.

Something most artists are guilty of is comparing themselves to other, more experienced artists, but the reality is that they were once where you are and it took a lot of practice and failures to hone their skill.

SANDRA
I’ve always been afraid to draw in a cartoony style because there is a certain expectation of me now. But recently I’m experimenting outside of my online stuff and it’s fun.

TARA:
You need to work out what is ‘fear’ and what is something that you just don’t like drawing, the only way you can do that is try it. And sometimes you assume you won’t enjoy something, but when you actually try it, you can feel really different.

SANDRA

There’s nothing more disheartening than spending hours or even days of your time on something that ends up going in the bin. But those pieces are never wasted… You will always have learned really valuable lessons from them and you go into your next piece armed with that little bit more knowledge.

TARA

Fear that you are wasting time, what would people think, should you really be doing something else.

Fear that other people may not like your art if you decide to share it.

You’re scared that your expectations exceed your current ability, which could lead to disappointment and negative feedback if you share.

Suggest that people listen to a previous episode on ‘Dealing with Negative Feedback’
SANDRA
Fear of starting – we procrastinate so much, whether that’s deciding what to draw or because we have an idea we want to get out. the problem might be that you have a perfect image in your head that you are scared to ruin that.

TARA:
I was like this with recent paintings. I still have one in my sketchbook that I am holding back on creating in case it doesn’t look good.

Some people are scared are trying certain mediums, for example watercolour. You will hear how tricky it is and that can put you off. Sometimes I wonder if my dislike of acrylic paint is caused by the fact it slows me down because of my lack of experience. If I put the time in maybe I would like it more, and break that barrier. – When I was a kid I really did not want to use colour, I think this stemmed from someone saying they preferred my black and white pencil drawings. But of course this was only really the case because I did them more and so had more practice.

SANDRA
I used to paint with watercolours because I was afraid of oils – The mediums all sounded so complicated. When my friend finally persuaded me to give them ago, I never looked back. They don’t have to be as complicated as they seem.

TARA
Fear of being able to follow something you have just created. When you create something you like, sometimes it’s scary trying to repeat that in case the next one doesn’t work

SANDRA
Fear/worry of going to an art class or workshop – Sometimes the unknown is far worse than reality, even if people are better than you they’ll generally just try and offer advice.

TARA:

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What is the best piece of art advice you have ever received?

SANDRA
Dorothy Walker “Experiment and do original things. Don’t copy other’s work, such as in tutorials, but let yourself be inspired by them.”

TARA:
Deb Saine never compare your work with someone else’s … bad art happens, so move on … you learn more from mistakes …

SANDRA
Cybel Gonzalez Nin Don’t give up, just try another medium!

TARA:
Carol Vasenko Never give up! Especially on a piece you think is hopeless. Keep going. You can turn it around.

SANDRA
Mary Flynn Don’t be afraid to make the darks really dark

TARA:
Mary Flynn Don’t take rejection personally, if you don’t get accepted into a show don’t take it personally

SANDRA
Sheryll Martin Try new things all your life

And life will take you on an adventure..art is a new thing for me and I am enjoying the adventure

TARA:
Mummsy Savo To be proud of my accomplishments and post my work for feedback all thanks to KitC and the support of the group I’m never now embarrassed x

SANDRA
Sue Colter Lesch Great artists were beginners once, you are seeing their work after years of practice.

TARA:
Kim Hine The same one I am giving Miss five year old … look for the shape of things and draw those. Learning that has made my art more accessible.

SANDRA
Flottefort “It is only a piece of paper. …if you fail you can throw it away ” from my drawing teacher

TARA:
Dorena Belle Petty Actually it’s a quote that I read recently. ‘I don’t wait for the muse, the muse waits for me. I just show up.’ Akiane Kramarik, child prodigy who started painting at age 4. She said this at about 9 years old. She is an amazing artist! This really struck a chord with me, too often I wait for the muse, or the weekend or until the dishes are done.

SANDRA:
queeniexcviiKeep practicing and don’t focus on your style. Get the basics down and through your practice your style will emerge just keep practicing.

TARA
Laughingoutloudatuorme Redoes are ok! Keep at it.. Just never through it away & quit!

SANDRA:
King_ah_england” Don’t stare at it for too long, if your over thinking it take a break and come back to it later” -My Wife @vannessa.l.king

TARA:
gorgebikefitter”Let go of expectations and outcomes. Play.” That and a version of something said above, “It’s only paint and a canvas. What’s the worst that can happen?”

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. Where do you see yourself creatively in 5 years?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Before we go, we just want to mention the challenges we have coming up for May.

So, first of all, we have a brand new challenge, ‘Blooming Marvellous May.

We are challenging you to create a piece of flower art, every day throughout May. You can use any medium you like such as paint, embroidery, clay, printing, digital or mixed media… You can even use actual flowers!

SANDRA:

We also see the return of ‘Miniature May.

We are challenging you to create a miniature piece of artwork, no more than 5 x 5 inches, every day throughout the month of May.

TARA:

We have Quick Kick May.

“Quick Kicks” are our monthly creative challenges that you can complete in 15 minutes or less per day.

For ‘Quick Kick May’ we are challenging you to create a simple drawing using your non-dominant hand, every day throughout the month of May.

This challenge stimulates the ‘creative’ side of our brains by using our ‘wrong’ hand. Studies have shown that when using our dominant hand, only one hemisphere of the brain is active, however by using our non-dominant hand, both sides of our brain are active.

SANDRA:

And finally, we have Kick Time May.

Kick Time is our monthly challenge designed for those creatives who would prefer to sink their teeth into one big project over the whole month, rather than to take part in lots of smaller ones.

And it’s designed for any kind of creative project. We will give you a prompt each month and you can use it to inspire a story, a poem, a piece of art, a piece of music, an animation, a film, a screen play… The list is endless!

The best part is that you get to work on any creative project, which is inspired by that word, for a whole month!

We will give you a brand new prompt word at the beginning of every month to use as your inspiration. The work for May is ‘Evolution.’

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

TARA:

Also, don’t forget to check out and subscribe to our Weekly Youtube videos, ‘Art Kick Sunday.’ The videos are light-heatred and fun, but also genuinely informative too. So if you want a chuckle, check out the ones we’ve aired so far.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Creative Podcast Relay

creative podcast relay

What is a Creative Podcast Relay?

As far as we know this is the first podcast relay. So what is it? Simply put, it starts off with one podcast  talking about a topic and then they tag another podcast or two to continue the topic on their own podcast. They then record a podcast and tag another podcast they love and so on and so on. What’s great with a creative podcast relay is that you’ll discover more creative podcasts you’ll love.

The Creative Topic

So we kicked off with the topic – Using Art to Convey a Message or story

We tagged both Your Creative Push and 3 Point Perspective

Links to podcasts taking part in The Creative Podcast Relay

We will add links to the post below as the podcast relay continues its journey

Your Creative Push – 333: Tell Your Story

In today’s episode we are going to explore the fact that your story doesn’t have to reach completion for you to start sharing it.  You simply have to share what’s inside of you.  The closer you can get to that message, the better it will be… not necessarily in quality, but in the weight that it carries for you and for others.

3 Point Perspective: How to Convey a Message or Story With Your Art

3 point perspective podcast logoJust because you’re drawing a picture doesn’t mean that you are saying anything. That’s a problem you see a lot of times with amateur illustration work they just draw a character or an environment with no story in mind and oftentimes people don’t know what’s going on or have any deeper questions that they want to know more about after seeing the illustration. That’s what we want to go over: how to tell a story and why that’s so important as illustrators.

The Creative Coping Podcast: Monday Motivation (Tell Your Story)

Creaive coping podcast iconWe are going explore the fact that your story doesn’t have to reach a completion for you to start sharing it. You simply have to share what’s inside of you. The closer you can get to that message, the better it will be…not necessarily in quality, but in the weight that it carries for you and for others.

Watch this space – more podcast will be added as they air…

 

Why Do People Love the Art you Hate?

love the art you hate

There are three different emotions when you have finished a piece of art. The first is you’re really pleased, you’ve made progress, or you actually quite like the work. The second is a kind of meh, indifference, while it’s not your greatest work, it doesn’t totally suck. The third is the “what on earth is that” piece of art, let’s face it we’ve all made some of those.

Let’s assume you are brave enough to post your creation on social media whatever you thought of it. Ironically you might just find that the “what on earth” is that, art creation could gather as many if not more likes and comments than the piece you liked. Why do you think that is?

I think it must be because we are too close to our own work. We can see what we perceive as flaws in our own work, perhaps because parts did not turn out as we intended. To a spectator, they see the piece as a whole without dissecting it. They may not spot your mistake, or may actually like it (the happy accident). This can be encouraging, although it can also give you the impression that people are just trying to make you feel better.

Of course, there is also the flip side. When you post a piece of work that you’re really proud of and all you get is tumbleweed. It’s incredibly disappointing. I think in this scenario you need to stick to what you believe and pursue the style or medium. Post more work and see what the response is. We have to remember too that social media doesn’t always play nice either. The time of day and hashtags you use can play a big part as well. It may be that fewer people have seen your good piece of art.

In the end, I guess it depends on why we are creating art. If it’s purely for ourselves then no-one else’s opinion matters. However, if we are seeking approval or trying to build a market for our work we need to bear in mind what the feedback is telling us. But there is another twist, are the people on social media the audience you want or need anyway?


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Create Cartoons with Everyday Objects Using Photos and Apps – Art Kick Sunday

We show you step by step how to take everyday objects and create cute cartoons with fun messages. You could use them to create cards, a comic strip, notebook covers, posters etc.

To create the cartoon first arrange the objects, take a photo, then draw on it with an app and finally add some text in Canva.

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 33. Using Art to Convey a Message or Story

Ep 33 Using Art to Convey a Message or Story

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about using art to convey a message. Art can be used to say something you want to express without having to actually say it. This could be anything from expressing your emotions to telling a story.

This is a special episode because it kicks off the start of a podcast relay. We have tagged two of our own favourite creative podcasts, which are the ‘Your Creative Push’ podcast, hosted by Youngman Brown and the ‘3 Point Perspective’ illustration podcast, hosted by Jake Parker, Will Terry and Lee White. They will then share their own thoughts on our topic on one of their future episodes. They, in turn, will tag another creative podcast to do the same… and so on.

But back to this episode. Today we talk about

  • How you can use your own experiences in your work
  • How you can put a twist on your own experiences and add humour
  • How creating art from something that annoys you could make you feel better
  • How choosing a well thought out title might add another dimension/extra interest to your work
  • How you can subconsciously put a message in your work, but not realise until you are finished.
  • How you can create art that has a meaning to you, but no one else has to know unless you want them to

Do you ever put a message or story in your work?

Somehow we also end up talking about family not putting dirty washing away and toilet roll tubes – sorry!

This week’s creative question

Q. What is the best piece of art advice you have ever received?

best creative advice question

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:

Welcome to the show.

Thanks to everyone who’s been sharing their work with us on social media

This is a special episode, because we are starting a podcast relay where we will tag two of our favourite podcasts an ask them to share their views on “Using Art to Convey a Message”. We are tagging Youngman Brown from Your Creative Push and the  Illustration podcast “3 Point Perspective” with Jake Parker, Will Terry and Lee White to share their views on the topic

Talk about the work that’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

TARA:

Respond to above.

I just want to remind everyone that the prompts we provide are optional. We seem to get a lot of people apologising for going off prompt, but that really doesn’t matter at all. They are only there if you are running out of inspiration

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

(mention the videos we have uploaded so far to Youtube)

SANDRA

In today’s episode, we talk about ways of conveying a message or a story through your art.

This can be anything from saying something you feel the need to say without having to actually say it; in other words a way of expressing a message or your feelings. To creating a piece that tells its own story. And everything in between.

We see it all the time don’t we; a painting of an object, maybe a still life or something and there is nothing more to it than that. It’s simply art that matches the decor.

And there is nothing more to it than that, but art can be so much more multi-layered than that, and a painting can have a much deeper meaning behind it, often something only the artist knows.

Or sometimes there is a more obvious story. And sometimes you’re just not sure and it leaves you asking questions. And I really like those ones in particular; the ones where you can almost create your own story.

Mention the painting I saw once of a woman embracing a man but looking elsewhere

Do you ever create a story in your own work Tara?

TARA

Not usually no. But I have drawn on my own experiences in the past and created fun things off the back of it.

It doesn’t necessarily have to be deep and meaningful…

For example…

Share your rabbit story (and any others)
Post-it cartoons

What about you Sandra? Do your paintings all have a meaning behind them?

SANDRA

I always find that when I paint something that has a story behind it, it turns out better than the ones that don’t and I think that’s because I’ve invested a little bit more of myself into the piece.

But not all of them have any meaning, no.

For example, I paint a lot of reflective things purely because I love capturing the play of light.

I once painted a raw egg and obviously, that was simply because I fancied painting a raw egg! But when I do paintings like that, I always try to give them their own story in the title. (Your Place or Mine).

TARA

Some stories are only clear at all when you see the title

Ask Sandra for some examples of titles she has come up with for those types of paintings

SANDRA

Apple – Not a Banana
Sweets – Toothache and Denture Venture
Cup with lipstick – Evidence

As obvious creative people as Artists are, I’m always really disappointed when I walk around a gallery and find paintings that are titled things like ‘Still life with apples’ or titles that are so literal. I can’t believe that they can’t come up with something more creative than that!

I find titling a painting to be as much fun as I do painting it!

The type of art you create Tara is more geared towards amusing stories, so I don’t suppose you need to title it do you?

TARA

No, but an idea for a series of drawings did pop in my head at the weekend which would have a message that would run through them, if it works.

Talk about the cartoon you made about running out of ideas so you’ve got to execute them
Talk about the cartoon strip you made of how we met on the Podcast
Other examples?

So what paintings have you done that have a deeper meaning behind them, Sandra?

SANDRA

I’ll talk a little bit about Light-fingered

I’ll talk a little bit about the lost bear story

Then…

I always say I have a light side and a dark side in my painting and I’m still trying to work out why that is. But I go through periods of both.

Whether that reflects my personality (I am a Gemini) I’m not sure… But maybe that’s just a pretentious way of looking at it!

So does your work change according to mood?

TARA

Respond to above

While I believe that some art is made to convey a message, sometimes I think that some artists have to come up with a message for their art in order for it to be more saleable, because that’s what is expected. I think art can be a bit pretentious like that sometimes

But it’s true that the way you feel can reflect in the work you produce.

SANDRA

But a lot of people stop creating when they feel depressed, but actually it can help to instead do more.

If you think about ‘Adele’ and the Album she wrote off of the back of her break up, she was literally splurging her own feelings out in words and out of that came some of her most popular songs.

And in the same way, other art forms can help you to document your thoughts and feelings when going through a darker period in your life.

TARA

Talk about art journaling and how it can almost be like self therapy. Mention that that is how Danny Gregory helped himself through his grief when his wife died.

SANDRA

Going back to Danny Gregory, mention the sketches he recently did during his cancer treatment. Mention that we know a few others who have done the same thing.

TARA

But you can use art journaling for the more usual things in your life. For example if you’ve had a crappy day, instead of letting yourself sink into a foul mood, why not create an illustrated page about it and put an amusing spin on it? Eventually you might be able to look back and laugh about it.
Give some of possible scenario examples

When I was at college I really didn’t like one lecturer we had. He would give us weird performance type projects to do. For example to sit with a friend and one had to meow and one had to bark like you were having a conversation. He decided that we should all give some sort of performance to the class. So I wrote and read a poem about all the ridiculous thing he had made us do

SANDRA

Add a couple of possible scenarios that can be turned into something fun
Talk about the guy who made the toilet roll tube teenage instructional video – Will Ried. Instead of allowing himself to get frustrated about it, he channelled his frustration into something that turned the whole thing into something really amusing.

TARA

Art of any kind can be used in the same way, whether it’s a funny poem, a short story… You can use any of it to lighten up something that might otherwise have you tearing your hair out.

If you are having a good time you can also use Art Journaling in that way too. Imagine capturing how you felt on holiday, or on a great day out. Unlike a photo, with sketches, you can capture your personal viewpoint with notes and images and tell a story of your day/moment.

SANDRA

Equally, you can put a deeper meaning in a piece of art and nobody ever has to know it’s not purely fictional. That’s the beauty of art… Only the artist has to know the whole story. They can choose to hold some of the story back And that’s true in the ones that leave the viewer asking questions… Example ‘Who is that person waiting for in the cafe’

TARA

Although your art may not necessarily have this great big meaning, sometimes the way you make your marks can say something about how you were feeling at the time. Was it engrossed in detail and delicate, whimsical or are your marks loose and energetic? It can take you back to how you felt when you made it.
SANDRA

And like Tara said, your art doesn’t have to have any meaning at all. If you want to paint something purely because you like the look of it then there’s nothing wrong with that, but sometimes it can be more fun to create something that has some relevance or meaning to you, even if the viewer doesn’t know.

Rose – petal example
TARA

The way you put together your composition, lighting and colour can also really completely change a mood or feeling that you put over to the viewer. You can make someone feel uneasy or comfortable all by changing your viewpoint and can change the story that you are telling. In general I am not a big Superhero series fan, but I loved the series Daredevil, not only because he is the worst Superhero ever, but also the amazing lighting and colours and compositions, that completely change how you feel.

SANDRA

Yes, it’s surprising how the exact same subject can convey a completely different feel just by changing the lighting.

It doesn’t need to be obvious at all… It could be something as simple as a look in someone’s eyes or an object that has some meaning to you or something like that.

TARA

You can twist stories in unusual ways to make something ordinary funny. I like to take ordinary situations and then try and twist bits into unexpected ways to make a cartoon.

I love the way cartoonist share how they feel, in interesting ways. Such as Maureen Marzi Wilson’s Introvert Doodles. She takes simple daily things that all introverts can relate to and makes a humorous story from them. And Gemma Correll completely puts her own spin on everyday things. For example she has a cartoon about being beach body ready where one of the suggestions is to stretch your belly button until it’s large enough to hold a beer can

SANDRA

It can even be completely fictional of course and not necessarily be directly related to the artist at all.
Think about the political cartoons you see. The story isn’t related to the artist, but may convey their own point of view on a political topic.

TARA

I’ve heard some artists talk about their art not intentionally having a story, but when they finish, they realise that there are elements that relate to an aspect of their life. So subconsciously there was a message within their work even if they didn’t realise it at the time.

SANDRA

Yes, that’s happened to me. I think it’s important not to force it, but try to be open-minded and allow a painting to take you where it wants to and see what happens. Forcing it will only lead to something that looks over contrived and you really don’t want that.
TARA

Some famous artists have left secret messages within their art
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/21/ten-paintings-with-intriguing-hidden-symbols-and-messages/
For example Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa has a series of hidden letters and numbers hidden within it, and no one else knows what they mean

SANDRA

Mention the film as an example – The Da Vinci Code

TARA:

Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. What do you do to stay creatively motivated?

TARAJohn Munro The following helps

1. Getting old and dreading not doing something I love

2. Running a writing group

3. Challenging myself mentally, because physically I’m no longer the Olympian I always imagined I was ( I was going to say athlete, but if Break Dancing is being considered an Olympic sport then I’m an Olympian )

SANDRA
Angela Murphy Pink gin does the trick for me lol only kidding!! Well not really kidding!! Things pop into my head at all stupid times of the day and if I don’t sketch something from the nonsense my brain generates I become a nightmare to live with!! So I suppose keeping my sanity keeps me creative!!

TARA
Christi C Neff Following my quest for peace. Running from stress. Hiding in my blue room. My creativity comes from within and is essential to keeping my sanity. Vodka… occasionally only because I haven’t tried pink gin yet.

SANDRA
Otilia Heimat Sometimes I will draw without thinking, other times I read an article or a book about art. Mostly, I go to an exhibition/gallery and that’s enough to trigger ideas.

TARA
Teresa Jolliffe Cameron I start a new job tomorrow after a year off so I know that I will need to purposefully schedule time for me.

SANDRA
Gabriela Popp The challenges push me to draw every day…. and that is my start of the day.

Regularly I take part in a portrait-drawing-group without a teacher, only to spend relaxing time together and share the costs for the model…

And an upcoming exhibition makes me busy, too. In May there are three

TARA
Mary Flynn Nature always inspired me. This group inspires me. Having to wake up at 4:30 every morning to go to work is inspiring me to work harder so I can become a full time artist.

SANDRA
Anna Sellers Our family plays roleplaying games once a week which gives more art needs than I can keep up with. We play Dungeons and Dragons. Because I post some of my images for our game, I have had requests for commissions

TARA
Russila Moodley Have been creatively motivated for as long as I can remember. ..it has expressed itself in poetry,photography, painting and writing a book!!

The problem is always finding time to unleash my passion in these creative ventures😊

SANDRA
little.finnish.artist

Surround myself with art every day for example watching YouTube videos and keeping sketchbook. If I’m somehow blocked I think what I most love about art and draw something that is connected with that.

TARA
tony_ley

@kickinthecreatives – I don’t hesitate. Whether it’s a small action like jotting an idea down in my phone’s memo or scribbling on a piece of paper or just going for a walk or talking an idea out loud or using my phone to record and talk an idea out….I take ANY kind of action in the moment. Then immediately act on the idea when you get a moment. It might not work or be want you wanted and maybe you’ll come back to it later…but doing SOMETHING will always be better than doing nothing.

SANDRA
blessinks

I have a sketchbook for every idea, but sometimes I challenge myself to visually relate two random words to get my brain going. I like to letter and I follow these lovely German calligraphers. I decided to do their lettering challenge in March with a twist. I put everything into Google Translate and lettered the literal translation. That’s been a challenge. #letteringforoneyear.

TARA
inklets

Stay focused on projects already in the works and make sure to take two days off a week now from drawing. Otherwise, I get overwhelmed and frustrated.

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What is the best piece of art advice you have ever received?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

Don’t forget we are tagging Youngman Brown from Your Creative Push and the  Illustration podcast “3 Point Perspective”with Jake Parker, Will Terry and Lee White to share their views on the topic, so keep an ear out for their podcast episodes too – links to their podcast will be in our show notes.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a little review on iTunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

Also, you can now subscribe to our Weekly Youtube video if you want to learn something creative every Sunday and see Tara and I making complete fools of ourselves at the same time!

The Advantages of Being a Beginner Artist

I often hear people say that when they go on a diet, they find it really easy to lose the first few pounds but then it gets harder. And the most difficult part, of course, is keeping the weight off long term.

I think the reason behind this, is that in the first few weeks, you are really determined; you continuously look into what are the right things to eat, you put time into exercising and you are motivated every time you lose another pound or two.

But then, the weight loss slows down and you start getting frustrated because it’s not coming off as quickly as it was before. And when (or even if) you finally reach your target, it’s really hard to stay there.

The same applies to beginner artists…

At first, you find yourself determined and really focused. You put a lot of time into active learning and practice. And since you had little or no knowledge of the fundamentals and techniques of drawing before you started, you find yourself improving really quickly.

But eventually, you reach a stage where the improvement process slows right down or even stops altogether. You’ve taken in all of the basics and you’ve practised them, but refining and developing is a much slower process, so it’s easy at this point to lose motivation.

So, if you’ve found yourself at a point where you’re seeing little improvement in your drawing skills and your art seems to be standing still, this could be a positive sign. It may simply mean that you’re ready to move on to the next stage.

To do this, you will need to experiment; to step out of your comfort zone and try making art that you think is out of your reach. By doing this you will be a ‘beginner’ again, but at a different level. And that means that you will find yourself learning and progressing forwards once again.

In other words, when you reach a goal post, be sure to move it!

Sandra x

Artist Inspiration not Imitation – Art Kick Sunday

Want to see Sandra and I do spectacular impressions of each other? Now’s your chance. 🙂

We explain why it’s fine to copy the styles of other artists at first, but why it’s important to find your own style. Plus we give some suggestions on collecting together inspiration. So it’s artist inspiration not imitation.

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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