When you are Learning to Sketch, which is more Important, Quality or Quantity?

 

It’s often the case that the beginner artist is so determined to get everything ‘just right’ that they end up with a sketch that is stiff and overworked.

The problem is that they are so focused on the result that they are not understanding the importance of the process. The best and most characterful sketches have a relaxed and fluid feel, and this does not come with being pedantic; it comes from pencil miles. It’s that simple.

If you were to spend 30 minutes drawing one subject as carefully and as accurately as you can, but the person next to you spends five minutes each, on six rough sketches, who do you think has grown the most?

Mistakes hold little importance when you are learning to sketch. It’s all about exercising hand-eye coordination, and the more you do it, the quicker it will begin to flow. Accuracy will follow naturally, with practice.

Indicating Faces in Quick Sketches – Art Kick Sunday

In this video, we suggest ways that you might indicate faces in a quick sketch. When people are moving or at a distance, it’s hard to get down much detail, so we give you our ideas on how we indicate facial features in quick sketches.

Tools Used

+Lamy Safari Fountain Pen
+Papermate Flair
+Stationery Island Water Brush

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

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Sketching Moving People and Objects

In this video, we offer some suggestions for practising drawing objects and people that move. This is useful if you want to sketch people, animals, vehicles etc from life.

Tools Used

+ Sammy Snail (Thank you Sammy, but you did leave a slimy trail on my desk)
+ Sketchbook from The Works

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 39 Creative Chat with Artist, Illustrator and Sketchbook Revival Creator Karen Abend

ep39 podcast Karen Abend Artist Illustrator Sketchbook Revival Creator

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Today’s creative guest is Karen Abend from www.karenabend.com. Karen is an artist and illustrator who licenses her work. You may also know her as the creator of Sketchbook Revival, a free online event which has run for the last two years. Sketchbook Revival brings together a group of art teachers to share their ideas and inspiration for filling up your sketchbook.

Walking map of Acicastello by Karen Abend

Walking map of Acicastello, Sicily digital illustration (where Karen lives)

Karen talks about

  • How her creative journey began
  • How she transitioned from the field of art conservation to creating her own art
  • What subjects she likes to draw and why
  • Her process for creating art
  • How she got started with art licensing and now licenses her greeting card designs
  • How and why she came up with the idea for Sketchbook Revival
  • Tips for building a sketchbook practice

The course Karen mentions where she learned about art licensing is by Lilla Rogers www.makeartthatsells.com

Vintage sewing pattern by Karen Abend

Vintage sewing pattern (digital design)

Artists that Karen mentions:

Karen Abend Suffragette Sisters digital illustration

Suffragette Sisters digital illustration

Find out more about Karen Abend

You can find out more about Karen and see her art and illustration on her website www.karenabend.com

Karen is hoping to run another Sketchbook Revival next year so sign up for her newsletter to get notified

 

Note: This post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means that if you use the link to make a purchase we will receive a very small commission, without any extra cost to you. This will help to support our website and podcast. Thank you so much.


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
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Eye Drawing Tutorial for Beginners Pencil – Art Kick Sunday

In this eye drawing tutorial for beginners, we show you how to draw a realistic eye in pencil. We go into details about drawing the different parts of the eye – the eyelashes, lid, iris, pupil and eye brow.

Tools Used

+ Staedtler 110-2B Tradition Pencil 2B
+ Torchon/Paper Stump

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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How Much is Your Art Worth?

 

It’s a common feeling amongst hobbyists’ that because they are not selling their work, their art is worthless and means far less than the art they see hanging upon the pristine white walls of a swanky art gallery.

So, is this true?

It really depends on how you value it. From a monetary point of view, art is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it. This is hard to judge because it very much depends on the right person seeing it.

For example, we know that a Jackson Pollock painting can sell for millions. However, would I buy one myself (if money was no object)? Probably not, because it’s simply not my cup of tea.  In that sense, what’s worthy to one is worthless to another.

Even when it comes to an art collector, often they will invest in a ‘signature’ and the art itself is secondary.

Art is subjective, therefore extremely hard to put a price on. A price will always be too high for one and too low for another.

So, what if we take money out of the equation? What is it’s value then?

Let’s first of all look at what value it has to the artist.

It’s sad but true that all too often a professional artist is painting what they know is likely to sell and that will please their collectors. Sometimes this comes at a cost to the artist because the value for them is more about what it pays than how the art makes them feel.

A hobbyist, on the other hand, is free to paint or draw whatever and however, they like. This is when art has the most value, I think; certainly to the artist.

It’s quite startling, the physical effects that anxiety can have. Art can be enormously therapeutic and beneficial to our mental health and this, in turn, has a knock-on effect on our physical health. Even something as seemingly trivial as a doodle has this kind of positive effect.

The power of creating is something we are often unaware of. We think the most important part of creating is the result, when the reality is, the most valuable part is the process itself.

So, whether you are drawing stick men with a biro, or creating hyper-realist oil paintings, the value can only truly be judged by the effect that the process has on the creator. The result is irrelevant.

In short, a doodle can hold just as much value as a Jackson Pollock, just in a different way.

Pen and Water Soluble Ink Drawing Tutorial (Using Water with Ink) – Art Kick Sunday

In this video, we demonstrate the lovely effects you can get by using a fountain pen with water applied with a brush.

Tools Used

+ Lamy Safari Fountain pen
+ Papermate Flair Pen
+ Canson Imagine Mixed Media Pad

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

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Ep 38 Art Experimentation – Breaking Out of Your Comfort Zone

podcast Ep 38 Art Experimentation

Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

In today’s episode, we talk about the importance of experimenting with your art and daring to break out of your comfort zone. But you might be asking yourself why is that even important at all? If you’re happy with how you paint, what’s the point in mixing things up?

But it’s very easy to stick to what you know because you want to master one technique… and there is nothing wrong with that, but by never experimenting with new techniques and mediums, not only could you be missing out on a whole lot of fun, but you might be denying yourself the opportunity to evolve as an artist.

We also talk about a new project we are launching called the “Rediscover Your Art” Sketchbook project to encourage more people to create art. You can find out more about the project here.

Some of the things we discuss:

  • That there are degrees/levels of experimentation, you don’t have to go from high realism to throwing paint about.
  • Simple experimentation ideas to get you started
  • Using unusual tools
  • Sandra has a weird idea about using painting with body parts!!!? And tells the story of the artists she saw on TV
  • Collage ideas, we also have an Art Kick Sunday Video about this
  • Drawing with different media – there are new materials coming out all the time which we discover in our Facebook Group. I mention water-soluble wax pastels and water-soluble oil pastels.
  • Drawing over different backgrounds

Plus there must have been a lot more as this is a long one

Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

This week’s creative question

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

(keep ’em clean)

Art Question wildest art materials

The best answers will be read out on the next joint podcast.

You can Tweet us your answers @KickCreatives or let us know in the Facebook Group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course, on our Instagram page @kickinthecreatives.

join the Kick in the Creatives Facebook Group

If you have any suggestions for the podcast or our challenges please feel free to get in touch.

 

To see the podcast show outline click here

SANDRA:

Welcome to today’s episode where Tara and I will be talking about why it’s good to experiment with your art techniques and also ways to help you break out of your comfort zone.

But before we go any further, we just want to say thank you for some new reviews we’ve noticed pop up on iTunes.

So the most recent ones are from:

Bit lumpy – And I’m so sorry I don’t know your real name

And he or she says…

Incredibly useful inspiring podcast
Just started listening and finding the ideas really inspiring and motivational. Loving this find!

Then we have

I’m in saine – Who of course Deb Saine

And she says…

“facing your art fears”
some of my favorite episodes are ones exactly like this one – just you two chatting about this and that: creating, of course, but also bras and panties, being strapped to a chair, olives, words like gouache and juxtaposition, saying cupboard instead of closet, fizzy drink instead of soda or pop, pronouncing ecology with a long e …

i love humor and people who have a sense of humor … and you two just always manage to make me laugh 🤭 😆 😂 … and enlighten and inform me about all kinds of things creative…

i also love the fact that you both are stellar artists who don’t take themselves too seriously … thank you both from the bottom of my heart! 😘 you don’t know how much you and this podcast and the fb group mean to me … and how you sometimes serve as a life preserver… and yes, still manic … 5.6.19

TARA

We also had a nice review from…

Glenn478

Episode 29
You two have great chemistry together.

K80fab

Says…

Love this podcast
Funny, practical, down-to-earth, and so encouraging. I love listening to this podcast. I am also engaged with the Kick community on Facebook and Instagram, so they become like friends. I am slowly working my creative life into engaging more and more with the challenges they present each month. They really have had an impact on my growth as an artist.

SANDRA:

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Thank everyone who’s been sharing their work on social media

Say what’s caught my eye

Ask Tara what’s caught hers

Catherine Slater’s copy of Toulouse Lautrec’s The Salon in the Rue de les Moulins”

Claire Dunpy who has shared an urban sketch she had done of the Riverside Festival in Leicester

John Munro who got invited to the BBC Writers Room

TARA:

Respond to above.

Ask Sandra what’s new

SANDRA:

Respond to above.

Ask Tara what’s new

TARA

Respond to above

You could mention the sketchbook idea

SANDRA

In today’s episode, we talk about the importance of experimenting with your art and daring to break out of your comfort zone. But you might be asking yourself why is that even important at all? If you’re happy with how you paint, what’s the point in mixing things up? And I used to ask myself the same question.

But it’s very easy to stick to what you know because you want to master one technique… and there is nothing wrong with that, but by never experimenting with new techniques and mediums, not only could you be missing out on a whole lot of fun, but you might be denying yourself the opportunity to evolve as an artist.

And we’re not talking about changing your style. We’re talking about ways to play alongside it, to have a bit of fun and discover a part of your creativity that you might not even know exists.

TARA

There are degrees of breaking out of your comfort zone – if you normally paint or draw realistically,  you don’t suddenly have to throw paint around. You could just change a little at first, maybe change subject matter or experiment with colour or use a palette knife rather than a fine brush

SANDRA

If never went to art school, one of the first things they will get you to do is experiment with simple mark-making and I remember doing this myself.

Explain what you do.

Talk about the video  – will put that one up this week.
TARA

Try experimenting with unusual tools – twigs, cotton buds, your fingers

Create your own tools – I did this in college. I vaguely remember making painting brushes from bits of string and twigs.

SANDRA

Paint with body parts?

If you are scared of doing anything too drastic, try your usual style, but perhaps over collage – simply stick bits of paper down and draw straight over or you can stick them down and paint over them with white acrylic or gesso so the elements are more subtle through the white. Use this as a base for painting over the top.

Talk about my recent attempts with collage

TARA

Mention the Collage video with my ‘unusual’ backgrounds.

Try cutting up bits of magazines and arranging them. You could collage or use them as a starting point for inspiration for a drawing (talk about the characters from chopped up magazine video). Talk about the experiment I have been meaning to try to create abstract faces.

Or you could simply Draw/paint on a different surface, even switching to work on a toned or coloured paper can make a change for your work.

SANDRA

Mention the woman on TV who drew charcoal figures on large sheets of newspaper and framed them. The figures looked really interesting, but the probably wouldn’t have had they been drawn on white paper.

TARA

Use a white pen on black paper. Try a scraperboard.

SANDRA

I hate the above idea!

But I do enjoy drawing in reverse – ie covering the paper with charcoal and drawing with a rubber.

TARA

Do you know what new art materials are out there – It never ceases to amaze me the new materials that are readily available now, that weren’t years ago. In our group, people talk about materials that I’ve never heard of and I have to ask what they are.
SANDRA

It’s easy to get comfortable with one thing and stick to that, but sometimes it’s good to persevere with something even if you don’t like it at first.

Explain how I hated the brush pen, but now I like it.

TARA

When you try one experiment you may find that it leads you to another.
I started using a pen and water brush for 5 minute march and then experimented with it for abstract faces and drawing outside. After using the face distortion app for showing how you could create a caricature, I realised there were other ways I could use it as a starting point for some faces I created with wax pastel.

SANDRA

Combine different materials – what combinations of materials could you try.  Some are a no-no, such as acrylic over oils, but oil pastels and watercolour could make a great combination, or soft pastels too. But you can experiment with all sorts of mediums.
TARA

I keep seeing charcoal and watercolour together and thinking how much I like it and that’s something I want to try. Carrie Brummer in an upcoming podcast talks about how she combines embroidery and painting.
SANDRA

Start or join a group so you pick up different ideas and techniques from others

TARA

Start a challenge with a friend to do something new. You could both take an online course together and learn something new or simply set yourself something to try for. Mention this is what started Kick in the Creatives off

SANDRA

Join a challenge – Talk about some of the people who tried lino-cutting for the first time for linovember as an example and how some of them carried on afterwards because they liked it so much.

TARA

I had never really done much in the way of abstract, but enjoyed creating semi-abstract faces for the challenge. Talk about how it got easier after the first experiments.

Set yourself constraints. Constraints can help you make interesting pictures. For example, you could create an image using entirely diagonal lines (talk about constraints video)

SANDRA

Change your scale – miniature/massive images. This is not as easy as it might sound. Talk about having to scale up that big marble painting.

TARA

Change the size of the brush you use. A larger brush will force you to be looser
SANDRA

If you normally paint from photos, paint from life
TARA

Get outside and draw – first steps could be just in your own garden and then venture further.

SANDRA

Sketch different things to the things you paint – Sandra talk about how you paint still life but you don’t draw it.
TARA

Try drawing or painting something you don’t think you like doing now and again. You can always try doing it in a different way
SANDRA

Respond to above

Keep it fun and don’t think any of this is about changing your style… But by experimenting, you can develop it.

TARA
Finally read out the answers to our previous question…

The question was…

Q. Do you ever feel guilty for spending time creating, and if so, what do you feel like you should be doing instead?

SANDRA
nordljusart – Absolutely not, but I permanently feel guilty for not spending enough time or no time at all creating…

TARA
lynnquireartist – Yes. There are times I do. Usually I feel like I should be spending time with the hubs or working on my business. The working on my business guilt I usually sometimes counter because I am actually trying to create more so I can eventually expand the business with surface design. But with the hubs time, it has been a struggle. I am trying very hard to restructure my days so creative time is built in and not taking over some other area of my life.

SANDRA
danny._chen. – I feel that the act of me drawing is not economically productive and I feel guilty about that.and other times I feel like I should be “experiencing life ” instead of doing bad drawings. But I feel better after finishing it.

TARA
jolakedraart – I don’t feel guilty! I feel sad that there’s enough time in a day to do everything that I like and need to do.

SANDRA
lorileegue – cleaning up the house, doing yard work… so many things I ‘should’ do …

2d1 likeReply

TARA
laeryel – No, I feel guilty if I’m not creating or training drawing. It’s the opposite

SANDRA
katiekarcheski – I feel like I should be focussing on the selling part more. I love creating… It’s my escape but a lot of the time I waste worrying if it will be good enough and how to make it sell.

TARA
truthinlove_2001 – I felt like I should be organizing at one point, but my Mom passed away recently and now I feel guilty doing any crafting and I’m not really sure why

SANDRA
Russila Moodley Initially yes….but soon realized that being creative brought me into true alignment with body,mind and spirit!I

It became my interpretation of “chop wood , carry water” and has helped me to cope with the most mundane of tasks💫💫💫

TARA
Deb Elen I never feel guilty about it because I know if I don’t make time to be creative I will become miserable and depressed. I do it to keep myself happy and on an even keel. It’s usually only time I would have wasted looking at social media or something anyway.

SANDRA
Mary Flynn Sometimes because I should be cleaning the house, but as soon as I walk into my studio that guilt goes away.

TARA
Rebecca Reynolds I feel a little bit guilty, as perhaps I should be doing housework… But my hubby is very supportive and encourages me! He’s a good un.

SANDRA
John Munro I never feel guilty it’s my Passion / hobby. Time Management helps.

My Beloved watches her soaps so I write in a separate room ( both happy )

Use my mobile phone whilst travelling to jot down ideas for expansion ( no I don’t drive and use my mobile )

TARA
Morwhenna Woolcock Sometimes and there’ll be lots of other things I think I ‘should’ be doing – which actually when I think about it are other creative things or exercise/ getting out walking or on my bike. Think it has something to do with my concept of time!

SANDRA
Dorothy Walker I never feel guilty doing arty things or gardening. My kids are playing poker, creating music, playing instruments, writing poetry or listening to music. No guilty feelings for anyone here! 😆😆

TARA
Krista Crescenzo I never feel guilty once I am doing it but I do feel guilty thinking about it sometimes. So then I feel I have to do the things I need to do first. Even though creating feels like a need too.

SANDRA
Mummsy Savo Never.. I’d have to go to Tesco with Himself 😂

TARA
Bradley Burgin Yes! Everything seems to be neglected in my mind. That is why I usually don’t create until most everyone is down for the night. Even then, I think I should be doing something more “productive.”

SANDRA
Meoc Artdis Yes and no. When I’m creating I want to create other stuff, such as comics, other pieces or write. But that creating gets in the way of homework, and chores.

TARA
Nea Edmans Housework

SANDRA
Angela Murphy Nea do like me and sweep the room with a glance 🤣🤣🤣🤣

TARA
Linda Butler I hate to say this, as my husband is supportive but I. Do feel guilty sometimes.

.

SANDRA

And we have a brand new question for you, which is:

Q. What is the wildest thing you’ve ever done with your art materials?

TARA:

As always you can Tweet us your answers at KickCreatives or let us know in the facebook group, which by the way if you haven’t already joined, I highly recommend that you do! We will put the question up there and also on the facebook page… and of course on our Instagram page, kick in the creatives.

SANDRA:

Don’t forget to pop over to our website at kickinthecreatives.com to find out how you can take part in some of our upcoming creative challenges! And of course there you can also subscribe to the Podcast, so you never miss an episode… And if you are enjoying the Podcast, we’d be so grateful if you would leave us a review on itunes, or even just a star rating if you don’t have much time.

 

Also, you can now subscribe to our Weekly Youtube video if you want to learn something creative every Sunday and see Tara and I making complete fools of ourselves at the same time!


We’ve now got a Youtube Channel where we put up a new Art Video every Sunday.
Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

How to Draw Noses Step by Step for Beginners – Art Kick Sunday

In this video, we show you how to draw a nose step by step in pencil. An important thing to consider is that noses don’t really have outlines. To draw them you can represent the 3D shape using shading and light areas. A shadow beneath the nose will also lift it from the face.

Tools Used

+ Staedtler 110-2B Tradition Pencil 2B
+ Torchon/Paper Stump

+ Some links are affiliate links. If you choose to buy anything through these links, we’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you 🙂 Thanks so much for your support!

We release a new Art Kick Sunday video every week. You can find them here

Don’t forget to Subscribe to our channel and click the notifications bell to be alerted on all our new videos.

subscribe Youtube channel

How to Be an Artist

How to Be an Artist…

  1. Memorise some intelligent cultural facts in order to impress whenever a social situation calls
  2. Ensure that your home is full of old clutter and that nothing looks new or shiny
  3. Have a cat, or have several cats
  4. Inside the art studio, wear an over-sized shirt, or preferably a smock, but be sure to cover it in painty finger marks
  5. Outside the art studio, ensure that you have paint in your unruly hair and choose a selection of clothes that don’t match or better still, completely clash with each other.
  6. Accessories should include fingerless gloves, a woolly hat or an over-sized scarf, along with a mysterious, tatty looking sketchbook
  7. Maintain an air of mystery at all times. Never give too much away
  8. Always pronounce your T’s, roll your ‘R’s
  9. Swap the word ‘yes’ for ‘yah’
  10. Never look at a digital device in public. Instead, either appear to be doing something mysterious in your sketchbook or pretend to be reading a classic Jane Austin novel
  11. Eat only vegan food in public
  12. Drink wine – And lots of it

Or…

  1. Just draw

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